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Withdrawing From Public High School

Sometime a student will request to be withdrawn from public high school and begin homeschooling. If that is the case for you and you can support them, I would encourage you to do it and not look back. You CAN pull your students out anytime you want to. If you want to get their high school grades first you could wait until the grades are released and then pull them. If they aren’t getting good grades, then you can pull them out BEFORE they get their grades, and then they won’t ever be on their transcript. Just a little high school tip :-)

public-school


If possible, I really recommend my beginning “Preparing to Homeschool High School” crash course. I find that starting at the beginning, and learning about homeschooling high school all at once is easier, to get you quickly up to speed. Some people watch the video, and then call me for a one-hour appointment or join the Gold Care Club so they can get additional consulting.

The biggest concern for parents puling their kids out at a high school level is often the transcript.  You will need to have the current public school transcript, if possible, so that your homeschool transcript includes BOTH schools – homeschool and public school. It doesn’t have to be an accredited transcript, but you do need a transcript so you know the exact course title, credit value, and precise grade in each class. As a homeschool parent, you become the academic clearing house for every educational experience.  I  have an entire chapter about that in my book, "Setting the Records Straight: How to Craft Homeschool Transcripts and Course Descriptions for College Admission and Scholarships."

You can do it!  Homeschooling is really fun!  I have transcript help available with the Total Transcript Solution.

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If you are curious about providing a great homeschool education for your gifted child, check out my audio training, “Gifted Education at Home.
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Comments 2

Guest - Lee (website) on Thursday, 03 June 2010 06:58

Thank you so much for sharing! Very valuable insights!
Blessings,
Lee

Thank you so much for sharing! Very valuable insights! Blessings, Lee
Guest - Zekesmom10 (website) on Thursday, 03 June 2010 06:51

I want to encourage parents who are considering removing their children from public school to just do it! My son was placed in a class for "at risk" kids in 8th grade (basically for sons of divorced parents). He was not given PE for three years! I didn't think that was right, but considering about a quarter of the kids in his class were in the same boat, I didn't concern myself beyond one brief inquiry.

For 11th grade, we moved to a new school district and found out he would not be able to graduate unless he made up all the PE he missed. He had to take triple PE for 11th grade and double up his senior year. He was taking PE NINE times each week. We were told he could get credit for classes at the YMCA, so we signed up for TKD and swimming only later to find out he would not get credit for those either.

He was failing chemistry, hated school and was unhappy with life. I decided to pull him out of public school and he did the work on his own while I worked. In six months, he had completed 11th grade AND 12th grade!

We moved to another state where I found out the HSE/GED could be taken at age 16 (in our previous state, a student had to be 19 or his class had to be already graduated). I didn't really know anything about transcripts, etc, so we decided this would be the way to go. Not only did he pass it, but he earned a perfect score in chemistry!

I definitely recommend removing students from public school who have a need or desire to be homeschooled. You won't regret it.
.-= Zekesmom10´s last blog ..STOP! =-.

I want to encourage parents who are considering removing their children from public school to just do it! My son was placed in a class for "at risk" kids in 8th grade (basically for sons of divorced parents). He was not given PE for three years! I didn't think that was right, but considering about a quarter of the kids in his class were in the same boat, I didn't concern myself beyond one brief inquiry. For 11th grade, we moved to a new school district and found out he would not be able to graduate unless he made up all the PE he missed. He had to take triple PE for 11th grade and double up his senior year. He was taking PE NINE times each week. We were told he could get credit for classes at the YMCA, so we signed up for TKD and swimming only later to find out he would not get credit for those either. He was failing chemistry, hated school and was unhappy with life. I decided to pull him out of public school and he did the work on his own while I worked. In six months, he had completed 11th grade AND 12th grade! We moved to another state where I found out the HSE/GED could be taken at age 16 (in our previous state, a student had to be 19 or his class had to be already graduated). I didn't really know anything about transcripts, etc, so we decided this would be the way to go. Not only did he pass it, but he earned a perfect score in chemistry! I definitely recommend removing students from public school who have a need or desire to be homeschooled. You won't regret it. .-= Zekesmom10´s last blog ..STOP! =-.
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