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Have a Morning Meeting

Oops. They were supposed to be independent and work on their homework. Instead they goofed off.  Tell me the truth, am I the only one this has happened to?

Have a Morning Meeting

Never underestimate a teenager’s ability to avoid work. Although sometimes these are intentional lapses, many times teens are simply focused on other things (like their hair, or their new shoes), and they forget trivial things like math assignments or research reports.

Of course, it would be nice to have teenagers suddenly just BE responsible one day. Nice, but unlikely. It is much more common for teenagers to slowly BECOME responsible. It takes a lot of time, and a lot of practice, often with constant shaping and molding from their parents. Kids do not start the first day of 9th grade as responsible adults. They BEGIN the process of becoming responsible adults.

I raised two boys, and I have heard unconfirmed reports that this process can take longer for boys than for girls...often into a young man’s 20’s. Naturally, this doesn’t apply to all boys, but don’t be shocked if your teens don’t magically become mature at age 18. It usually doesn’t work out as neat and tidy as all that.

What is the solution?  Have a morning meeting!

Having a morning meeting can help. If you check in with your child each day, you can shape and mold their ‘responsibility index.’ A quick 15 or 30 minute check-in each day can give you the time you need to assess the situation and correct the behavior, shaping and molding your child’s responsibility as you go.  It's all about shaping and molding...

See what Susan had to say about morning meetings that she put in place in her house.See what Susan had to say about morning meetings that she put in place in her house.

"Thank you for your morning meeting concept and for sharing that in your webinars. We’ve taken that idea to heart and it’s bearing wonderful fruit. Our days are going the smoothest ever and we experience more joy. "Thank you for your morning meeting concept and for sharing that in your webinars. We’ve taken that idea to heart and it’s bearing wonderful fruit.Our days are going the smoothest ever and we experience more joy.

We instituted morning meetings faithfully this year for the first time. We’d held morning meetings before, but without this much mutual commitment, dedication, and persistence. Each morning we gather for scripture, a devotional, time of reflection and prayer then discuss the day. We talk about what is “on” for the day, any meetings, extracurriculars, and I ask “Where do you need me today?” and “How can I support you today?”. Too, we are appreciating the morning meetings so much that we made sure to made an end of day meeting constant as well. We discuss how the day went, focus on blessings and highlights as well as any challenges. Then, we end noting what went particularly well/top blessings.We instituted morning meetings faithfully this year for the first time. We’d held morning meetings before, but without this much mutual commitment, dedication, and persistence. Each morning we gather for scripture, a devotional, time of reflection and prayer then discuss the day. We talk about what is “on” for the day, any meetings, extracurriculars, and I ask “Where do you need me today?” and “How can I support you today?”. Too, we are appreciating the morning meetings so much that we made sure to made an end of day meeting constant as well. We discuss how the day went, focus on blessings and highlights as well as any challenges. Then, we end noting what went particularly well/top blessings.

These conversations are gold! Again, thank you." 
~ Susan

have a morning meeting Susan


A morning meeting can help your child stay on task, so they do not ‘forget’ school for a week (or longer!) and suddenly fall hopelessly behind. A daily meeting is a great goal. In practice, of course, a day will be missed here and there. We are all busy people with busy lives, after all! But if you forget a day or two, you will still benefit. If you miss a few days, you can regroup and discover any missed assignments.

In real life, adults are often faced with frequent ‘check-ups.’ In our business, we attempt to have regular meetings with our employees. While they do not ALWAYS happen, they USUALLY happen, and the meetings help us stay on top of any missed assignments.  Regular meetings, and quick check-ins are real life.  And they really work.

If you tend to fall behind, or if you see your student overwhelmed by an insurmountable mountain of work, instituting a ‘Morning Meeting’ can be the perfect answer.



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Perfect Children Work Perfectly Independently
The Problem with Homeschoolers
 

Comments 4

Guest - Damomof3 on Monday, 08 August 2016 19:21

My teens have done that for 2 years now. I'm burnt out.

My teens have done that for 2 years now. I'm burnt out.
Guest - Assistant to The HomeScholar on Tuesday, 09 August 2016 15:47

I'm sorry, Marlene!
I think we all go through that at one time or another. Lee has even written about it here: iTired: Dealing with Homeschool Fatigue
Robin
Assistant to The HomeScholar

I'm sorry, Marlene! I think we all go through that at one time or another. Lee has even written about it here: iTired: Dealing with Homeschool Fatigue Robin Assistant to The HomeScholar
Guest - Julie on Tuesday, 09 August 2016 07:04

I look forward to reading & learning many things. This will be our first year homeschooling our 11yr. Old son & 5 yr.old daughter.

I look forward to reading & learning many things. This will be our first year homeschooling our 11yr. Old son & 5 yr.old daughter.
Guest - Assistant to The HomeScholar on Tuesday, 09 August 2016 15:52

Good for you, Julie!
You took the plunge! It's scary at first, but it gets easier! You know your children best, so you can best meet their needs. Your 11 year old is at "middles school" age, so I thought this article that might answer some questions for you: Taming Middle School Anxiety
Blessings,
Robin
Assistant to The HomeScholar

Good for you, Julie! You took the plunge! It's scary at first, but it gets easier! You know your children best, so you can best meet their needs. Your 11 year old is at "middles school" age, so I thought this article that might answer some questions for you: Taming Middle School Anxiety Blessings, Robin Assistant to The HomeScholar
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Thursday, 14 November 2019

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