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When the Cows Come Home - Homeschooling and Animal Husbandry

Some kids just love cows. Some kids work hard with 4-H and love other farm animals. What does a college prep cow education look like?


cow


I have found that sometimes it can be helpful to show kids what a degree might look like in the area they are interested in. Sometimes that will really encourage them to focus on being college ready, in case they decide to go to college.

A degree in animal husbandry (raising livestock) is a science degree that will require biology and chemistry. That means moving along in math, rather than focusing on business or consumer math. It also requires nutrition. It requires a knowledge of genetics, so an AP Biology course would be a bonus.

As an example, check out the Cornell catalog for course titles. Here is their Animal Sciences department and their course list for Animal Sciences students.

I read a book about the Colfax family, who used animal husbandry and other homesteading skills in their homeschool, and how their children went on to go to prestigious colleges. It might be VERY encouraging for parents!

Another book that utilizes life learning is Barb Shelton's book, "Senior High: A Home Designed Form+U+La". I thought it was a good book, but a little complicated to read sometimes. It may help you to feel like homeschooling with a farm is a good idea, and the stories are great. However, I found her record keeping completely overwhelming.

Hey, if my children can get passionate about chess, why not get enthusiastic about cows, right?

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Comments 1

Guest - J W on Thursday, 07 January 2010 20:14

My daughter (7th grade) has a hard time getting people to take her seriously when she asks about what course of study she'd need in order to do the job of whoever she's asking. Invariably, the answer is either "stay in school," (like she has a choice with homeschool, LOL), or "Ohh... Just study what you like and have fun, you've got plenty of time." The latter is good advice, I'll admit, but that's not what she wants to hear. She has to say, "No, really, what did *you* study in college and how did you get this fantastic job?" Then people start taking her seriously.

My daughter (7th grade) has a hard time getting people to take her seriously when she asks about what course of study she'd need in order to do the job of whoever she's asking. Invariably, the answer is either "stay in school," (like she has a choice with homeschool, LOL), or "Ohh... Just study what you like and have fun, you've got plenty of time." The latter is good advice, I'll admit, but that's not what she wants to hear. She has to say, "No, really, what did *you* study in college and how did you get this fantastic job?" Then people start taking her seriously.
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Saturday, 24 August 2019

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