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Weighting Grades



homeschooling gifted children, gifted education, the homescholar


Weighting Grades


Is the stress of weighting grades weighing you down? Let go of that burden!





Teri on facebook asked this question: How to compete with the 5 pt grading scale in public school...they take a college credit type class and it's weighted at 5 pts vs 4pts for an A then their GPA can be higher than 4.0 overall. A friend told me that some exclusive/ivy league colleges aren't even looking at kids unless their GPA is near 5 or at least over 4.


Colleges tell me that they take weighted grades and un-weight them and then weight them again the way the COLLEGE wants them weighted. The colleges I spoke to at the college fair two weeks ago said that weighting scores made it more difficult for them, and they prefer it when scores are NOT weighted. I'm sure there are some exceptions, but this is what I was told just two weeks ago. For more information, call the college you are considering and ask them what they want - then give it to them.



homeschooling gifted children, gifted education, the homescholar

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Comments 3

Lee Binz on Friday, 06 April 2018 14:21

Each college is unique. Always do as your favorite college asks. That is why it is important to get to know the college. Many colleges will remove weighted grades and others will include them, but there is no agreed standard of how to weight grades. So, if you discover they do want them, it is very important to ask them how they want them weighted. Don't assume or do it based on internet advice.

Blessings,
Lee

Each college is unique. Always do as your favorite college asks. That is why it is important to get to know the college. Many colleges will remove weighted grades and others will include them, but there is no agreed standard of how to weight grades. So, if you discover they do want them, it is very important to ask them how they want them weighted. Don't assume or do it based on internet advice. Blessings, Lee
Laurie Beth Keller on Friday, 06 April 2018 10:56

FWIW, I followed your advice, unweighted all grades and have "Unweighted GPA: x.x" on the transcript. My student and I called the admissions counselor at her first choice school about merit scholarships. Her answer surprised us: based on 2 things: SAT/ACT scores and gpa. The surprising part was her example student had a 4.2. Confused I asked and she explained this school WANTS weighted GPA's for the purpose of merit aid as they recognize kids who take more rigorous work should be recognized for such. She went on to say honors gets an extra 0.5 and true AP (courses approved by the College Board, not courses with just an add on AP exam) get a full extra 1.0. So, yes, it is very important to call and ask specific schools. She did add that it was probably a good idea to publish both the weighted and unweighted GPA on the transcript.

FWIW, I followed your advice, unweighted all grades and have "Unweighted GPA: x.x" on the transcript. My student and I called the admissions counselor at her first choice school about merit scholarships. Her answer surprised us: based on 2 things: SAT/ACT scores and gpa. The surprising part was her example student had a 4.2. Confused I asked and she explained this school WANTS weighted GPA's for the purpose of merit aid as they recognize kids who take more rigorous work should be recognized for such. She went on to say honors gets an extra 0.5 and true AP (courses approved by the College Board, not courses with just an add on AP exam) get a full extra 1.0. So, yes, it is very important to call and ask specific schools. She did add that it was probably a good idea to publish both the weighted and unweighted GPA on the transcript.
Guest - Homeschool High School Credits (website) on Monday, 28 March 2016 00:05

Weighted grades are for honors classes, college courses, AP classes, etc.  Since these course are more rigorous, they have a greater GPA value than other high school courses, so receive a 1-point increase in their numeric value.  Use the higher value for that course and then calculate the GPA as usual.

Weighted grades are for honors classes, college courses, AP classes, etc.  Since these course are more rigorous, they have a greater GPA value than other high school courses, so receive a 1-point increase in their numeric value.  Use the higher value for that course and then calculate the GPA as usual.
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