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Three Months of College Can Equal One Year of High School!

college



Three Months of College Can Equal One Year of High School!


In community college, they don't spend a whole year working through a calculus textbook; they spend three months. Students in community college also don't go through a level of French in one year, they spend three months, instead. It takes a whole year to get a credit in high school American History. In college, you can finish the course in a quarter or semester. Students will usually take three full courses at a time, then three months later they take another three classes, and then another three classes. In high school, calculus covers...just calculus. In a year of college calculus, students cover calculus 1, calculus 2, and differential equations. This is why...




  • What a high school calls one credit will be covered in one year, while a college will cover the same material in three months and call it 5 credits.

  • In other words, three months of college can equal one whole year of high school.


Each high school has its own way of translating community college credits into high school credits, and some colleges don't like credits for community college classes. However, if you are looking to try to reconcile college credits onto a high school transcript, you may want to consider that 5 college credits = 1 high school credit.

Is your child taking dual credit classes at a community college? Please share!

Three Months of College Can Equal One Year of High School!


 

 

Please note: This post was originally published in August 2008 and has been revamped and updated for accuracy and comprehensiveness.

Would you like to learn more about how you can homeschool college? Check out my Coffee Break Book for Kindle/Kindle app, How to Homeschool College: Save Time, Reduce Stress, and Eliminate Debt!
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Comments 15

Guest - Debbie on Thursday, 20 August 2015 08:36

My experience with community college classes began after I (a mom of three, my oldest daughter finishing her Senior year) graduated from high school having NOT BEEN COLLEGE BOUND. Had no idea what I wanted to do and took the easiest classes possible in high school. Suddenly facing the reality of supporting myself and seeing all my friends go to college I decided that's what I would do and ...I'd go to the best college in my state. I didn't have the GPA or ACT scores for the University of Michigan, so I went to my local community College for two years. I choose classes that the U of M guidance counselor said would transfer into the Business school. I was going BIG. I graduated from U of M. None of my classmates could imagine how I got in.... The secret is that once you have your associates degree, you've proven you ability to succeed at the college level. Also, transferring into a college or university as a junior is not as competitive as applying as a freshman. So, I am encouraging my kids to finish high school with their AA. Then they can skip all the General Education Requirements and go right into their field of interest. There is a hitch. Depending on how focused a particular degree program is at a given school, you may have to retake a few of your classes at their school. So, you have to pay for retakes, but it insures a level of success for the universities degree program. I'm thinking fields of study like architecture, engineering; you may have to take THEIR MATH CLASSES, or design classes even if you already took comparable classes at another college. So, if your child has a particular goal and university in mind talk to the guidance department from the university they are eventually seeking.

My experience with community college classes began after I (a mom of three, my oldest daughter finishing her Senior year) graduated from high school having NOT BEEN COLLEGE BOUND. Had no idea what I wanted to do and took the easiest classes possible in high school. Suddenly facing the reality of supporting myself and seeing all my friends go to college I decided that's what I would do and ...I'd go to the best college in my state. I didn't have the GPA or ACT scores for the University of Michigan, so I went to my local community College for two years. I choose classes that the U of M guidance counselor said would transfer into the Business school. I was going BIG. I graduated from U of M. None of my classmates could imagine how I got in.... The secret is that once you have your associates degree, you've proven you ability to succeed at the college level. Also, transferring into a college or university as a junior is not as competitive as applying as a freshman. So, I am encouraging my kids to finish high school with their AA. Then they can skip all the General Education Requirements and go right into their field of interest. There is a hitch. Depending on how focused a particular degree program is at a given school, you may have to retake a few of your classes at their school. So, you have to pay for retakes, but it insures a level of success for the universities degree program. I'm thinking fields of study like architecture, engineering; you may have to take THEIR MATH CLASSES, or design classes even if you already took comparable classes at another college. So, if your child has a particular goal and university in mind talk to the guidance department from the university they are eventually seeking.
Guest - Assistant to The HomeScholar on Friday, 21 August 2015 00:37

Dear Debbie,
Thank you for sharing your experience! Lee says we should always prepare our children for college, because of that very thing. Teens change their minds. Well done. You made it work!
Blessings,
Robin
Assistant to The HomeScholar

Dear Debbie, Thank you for sharing your experience! Lee says we should always prepare our children for college, because of that very thing. Teens change their minds. Well done. You made it work! Blessings, Robin Assistant to The HomeScholar
Guest - Nancie on Monday, 04 May 2015 11:06

My daughter is taking dual enrollment at our Jr College, but she is only allowed to take 6 units/ 7 with permission of the Dean. And unless she passes the Math entrance test she cannot take a lower division math, no high school remedial math. And she cannot take a PE course.

My daughter is taking dual enrollment at our Jr College, but she is only allowed to take 6 units/ 7 with permission of the Dean. And unless she passes the Math entrance test she cannot take a lower division math, no high school remedial math. And she cannot take a PE course.
Guest - Assistant to The HomeScholar on Tuesday, 05 May 2015 16:11

Dear Nancie,
It sounds like your daughter's choices are a bit limited, but you are making it work for you! Well done.
Blessings,
Robin
Assistant to The HomeScholar

Dear Nancie, It sounds like your daughter's choices are a bit limited, but you are making it work for you! Well done. Blessings, Robin Assistant to The HomeScholar
Guest - Loretta on Saturday, 30 August 2014 10:40

Lee,

I simply checked with my local public school and asked THEM how THEY count a semester of dual enrollment. 1 class in 1 semester = 1 year class in high school. No need to count credits.

Lee, I simply checked with my local public school and asked THEM how THEY count a semester of dual enrollment. 1 class in 1 semester = 1 year class in high school. No need to count credits.
Guest - Assistant to The HomeScholar on Tuesday, 02 September 2014 18:03

Loretta,
Good thinking! I wonder if some school districts would handle it differently...
Robin
Assistant to The HomeScholar

Loretta, Good thinking! I wonder if some school districts would handle it differently... Robin Assistant to The HomeScholar
Guest - Cheryl (website) on Thursday, 01 March 2012 17:02

Thanks Lee

This is a great reminder as we finish with our youngest who is a junior. Our oldest graduated from H/S with college credit from Taylor Univ. online. Worked very well for us. God Bless Cheryl

Thanks Lee This is a great reminder as we finish with our youngest who is a junior. Our oldest graduated from H/S with college credit from Taylor Univ. online. Worked very well for us. God Bless Cheryl
Guest - Lee (website) on Tuesday, 21 June 2011 13:15

Debbie,
Yes, it can be complicated since some schools are semester, some are quarter system.... I think the bottom line is one full college class (however many credits) is equal to one full high school credit. But did you know that each school district will also have their own method of calculating that? So really, we can use a method that make sense and still be OK
Thanks for your thoughtful comment, Debbie!
Blessings,
Lee

Debbie, Yes, it can be complicated since some schools are semester, some are quarter system.... I think the bottom line is one full college class (however many credits) is equal to one full high school credit. But did you know that each school district will also have their own method of calculating that? So really, we can use a method that make sense and still be OK :) Thanks for your thoughtful comment, Debbie! Blessings, Lee
Guest - Debbie on Friday, 17 June 2011 15:04

Hi, Lee,
Just a note to let you know that some community colleges give 3,4,or 5 credits for a three month, one-year equivalent course. Given that, I tell parents that a quarter or semester-long college course is equivalent to one year on the high school transcript, rather than state that so many credits = one year.

I've been saying that to parents since 1998 when our oldest two graduated, and did the same with our youngest of five graduated in June 2010. Those dual credits were also accepted at the Christian colleges and universities they attended after graduating. That usually happens when the course descriptions of the community college catalog is close to that of the university catalog for the same course.

Thanks for keeping us up-to-date, Lee!
Blessings,
Debbie

Hi, Lee, Just a note to let you know that some community colleges give 3,4,or 5 credits for a three month, one-year equivalent course. Given that, I tell parents that a quarter or semester-long college course is equivalent to one year on the high school transcript, rather than state that so many credits = one year. I've been saying that to parents since 1998 when our oldest two graduated, and did the same with our youngest of five graduated in June 2010. Those dual credits were also accepted at the Christian colleges and universities they attended after graduating. That usually happens when the course descriptions of the community college catalog is close to that of the university catalog for the same course. Thanks for keeping us up-to-date, Lee! Blessings, Debbie :)
Guest - Lee (website) on Friday, 13 November 2009 13:25

I haven't seen this in any of the college I have dealt with, but I have heard other veteran mothers talk about it. It seemed strange to me too! I also wonder if it is different after the AA degree is completed - or if it's only different with an AA degree in Washington State, where we have the joint agreement. It's good to have a heads-up on the possibility, so that you can check into it for your own college.
Blessings,
Lee

I haven't seen this in any of the college I have dealt with, but I have heard other veteran mothers talk about it. It seemed strange to me too! I also wonder if it is different after the AA degree is completed - or if it's only different with an AA degree in Washington State, where we have the joint agreement. It's good to have a heads-up on the possibility, so that you can check into it for your own college. Blessings, Lee
Guest - Sally Weber on Friday, 13 November 2009 09:53

I have to say that everything I have heard goes against this - Most colleges that I have heard about, say they actually prefer dual credit because it shows the ability to participate and handle a college level course whereas AP does not.

I have to say that everything I have heard goes against this - Most colleges that I have heard about, say they actually prefer dual credit because it shows the ability to participate and handle a college level course whereas AP does not.
Guest - Kimm on Friday, 13 November 2009 09:42

Seems like this would more be private colleges? UW, for example, has a chart on their website that's very informative re: what courses transfer from the CC. Of course, too, if the student completes his AA those issues are no longer. Thanks for your reply.

Seems like this would more be private colleges? UW, for example, has a chart on their website that's very informative re: what courses transfer from the CC. Of course, too, if the student completes his AA those issues are no longer. Thanks for your reply.
Guest - Lee (website) on Friday, 13 November 2009 08:09

Hi Kimm,
No all universities believe that classes at community college are rigorous enough to be a college class. For that reason, some homeschoolers choose to take an AP exam after a community college class, so that if the community college credit isn't accepted, they hope the AP credit is accepted. Like MOST things, every university policy is VERY unique, so you want to check. I wouldn't assume one way or the other, and I wouldn't give additional AP exams unless you check with the university first.
Blessings,
Lee

Hi Kimm, No all universities believe that classes at community college are rigorous enough to be a college class. For that reason, some homeschoolers choose to take an AP exam after a community college class, so that if the community college credit isn't accepted, they hope the AP credit is accepted. Like MOST things, every university policy is VERY unique, so you want to check. I wouldn't assume one way or the other, and I wouldn't give additional AP exams unless you check with the university first. Blessings, Lee
Guest - Kimm on Friday, 13 November 2009 08:05

I have never heard that colleges don't like CC credits on a high school transcript. . . why is that?

I have never heard that colleges don't like CC credits on a high school transcript. . . why is that?
Guest - sallie (website) on Saturday, 16 August 2008 16:48

WOW, Lee, I didn't know that!!

My daughter is hoping to finish up her junior and senior year together this year. We will see how it works out.

God bless,
Sallie

WOW, Lee, I didn't know that!! My daughter is hoping to finish up her junior and senior year together this year. We will see how it works out. God bless, Sallie
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