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Teaching Technology to your Homeschoolers

The great thing about technology classes is that there is NO LIMIT to the kinds of skills your child can learn!  If your child is already good at computers, then they can get a technology credit in one of two ways.

Homeschool Teens with Computer



First, you can expand and use the skills they have on real technology work.  If they have computer skills, they could make a website, set up a blog or other social media, create videos, or any other task they enjoys already. Some kids will get a job or internship helping others with their computers, or doing computer skills for a business.   You count the hours that they spend doing this stuff, and when you get to 150 you have the credit for the year!

Second, you can brainstorm other topics that your child would like to learn.  Perhaps they want to learn a programming language, or learn about computer hardware or photo editing.  Then you can locate a tutorial for just that particular skill.  You can often find tutorials free on the internet, or at the library.  If they don't know what they want to study, I often suggest getting a tutorial from the library on how to use Microsoft Office.  That includes Word, Excel, Powerpoint and.... the other one that I can never remember :-)  Anyway, simply taking those tutorials and using those programs on their regular schoolwork, will enable them to become computer savvy and even use those skills in the workplace.

One final word, please make sure to include basic typing skills in the mix.  A good introduction to typing and 10-key will help a lot in the long run.

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Comments 4

Guest - Suzanne on Wednesday, 23 May 2012 06:31

Dianne,

Check out HomeschoolProgramming.com. They have courses where you have a book but also work on the actual programming project and all the software they suggest is free. They have game programming as well as other things and the courses are written by homeschool parents who are actually software programmers themselves.

Dianne, Check out HomeschoolProgramming.com. They have courses where you have a book but also work on the actual programming project and all the software they suggest is free. They have game programming as well as other things and the courses are written by homeschool parents who are actually software programmers themselves.
Guest - Home School College Counselor (website) on Saturday, 26 September 2009 17:42

I great idea for students to pursue while in high school is to create a blog chronicling what they're learning. Not only will it help with writing and computer skills, but it may also get them thinking creatively how they can use the internet for entrepreneurial activities as well. Especially if they begin to attract much attention, Google Adsense could be used to make a profit!

I think the other Microsoft Office product you're referring to is 'Access'.

I great idea for students to pursue while in high school is to create a blog chronicling what they're learning. Not only will it help with writing and computer skills, but it may also get them thinking creatively how they can use the internet for entrepreneurial activities as well. Especially if they begin to attract much attention, Google Adsense could be used to make a profit! I think the other Microsoft Office product you're referring to is 'Access'.
Guest - Lee (website) on Tuesday, 22 September 2009 11:39

Dianne,
Check out DigiPen as a college option:
https://www.digipen.edu/
See if you can visit them at a college fair. Then look into the DigiPen ProjectFun for next summer:
https://projectfun.digipen.edu/workshops/courses/.

Dig around on the DigiPen site and see if you can find what educational materials they use. In general, though, books aren't going to be helpful. Game programming is interesting to hands-on and high-tech learners who like curriculum that is high-tech and hands-on, so books probably won't be effective.

I hope that helps!
Blessings,
Lee

Dianne, Check out DigiPen as a college option: https://www.digipen.edu/ See if you can visit them at a college fair. Then look into the DigiPen ProjectFun for next summer: https://projectfun.digipen.edu/workshops/courses/. Dig around on the DigiPen site and see if you can find what educational materials they use. In general, though, books aren't going to be helpful. Game programming is interesting to hands-on and high-tech learners who like curriculum that is high-tech and hands-on, so books probably won't be effective. I hope that helps! Blessings, Lee
Guest - Dianne (website) on Tuesday, 22 September 2009 11:21

This has been great for my youngest son. But I'm having difficulty figuring out how to teach him game programming. It's what he's very interested in doing, and we've purchased a few books, but it seems that none of them really pans out for him. We've also checked books out of the library. I just can't seem to figure out a way to get him going with this subject, even though it's what he really wants to do.

If it were just Office products, graphics, blog design, html, it'd be so much easier.

This has been great for my youngest son. But I'm having difficulty figuring out how to teach him game programming. It's what he's very interested in doing, and we've purchased a few books, but it seems that none of them really pans out for him. We've also checked books out of the library. I just can't seem to figure out a way to get him going with this subject, even though it's what he really wants to do. If it were just Office products, graphics, blog design, html, it'd be so much easier.
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