South Carolina Wins the Wacky GPA Prize!

SC Wins Wacky GPA Prize @TheHomeScholarSouth Carolina Wins the Wacky GPA Prize!


And the winner is... South Carolina Public Schools! They get the prize for the silliest, most nonsensical grading scale conversion! Do not be fooled - this is NOT a requirement for homeschoolers. This is a public school grading scale, not a reason for more gray hairs, ladies.

My intention is NOT to make fun of a public school system or anything, but let's take a look at it and enjoy a good laugh together for a minute! Don't hyperventilate or panic or anything - this is NOT for you to use!

SC grade point conversion chart
A student could graduate with a perfect 5.875 GPA if they took all AP classes, or all community college classes, but a perfect student, taking only all Honors classes can only earn a 5.375.  But wait, there's more! A perfect student taking all college prep classes would earn a 4.875 GPA.

Of course, few students are perfect. What if your child got a very low B, the lowest possible grade of B, but they were taking all AP classes? Then your child would get the previously perfect 4.0 GPA. I'm serious. A straight B is a 4.0 in this public school system.

"But wait!" you ask. "What happened to earning a perfect 4.0?"

Isn't an A worth a 4.0 anymore? Maybe it is in your neighborhood of the country, but not in South Carolina. And what exactly is the difference between college prep, honors, AP, IB, and dual credit? That's pretty murky...

I declare this grading scale conversion chart to be wacky! You can quote me.

Homeschoolers, do not imitate the worst! Create the best!

Let me repeat myself, you do NOT need to use this grading scale. It's used by public schools who are trying to show the awesome GPA of their average student, by making every child appear above average. Nobody is fooled - least of all colleges. They look at inflated grades and know what they need to do. First, they deflate all grades. Then they see how smart these kids REALLY are.

But you, my fine homeschool friend, do not need to get sucked into the public school system way of thinking. You can choose any grading scale you like. Sure, if you live in South Carolina (or even South Dakota) you could choose to use this scale if you wanted to - but why would you want to? It just makes my palms sweat, thinking about all the math calculations involved in figuring the GPA for a child that is, you know (Heaven forbid!) normal.

Know Your State Homeschool Law

Homeschoolers in South Carolina, and other states, please use a grading scale that fits your independent homeschool. Don't tell your neighbors to use the grading scale that you use, thinking it's one-size-fits-all. In this case, I'm thinking one size won't even fit most. No offense.

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Comments 12

Guest - Linda on Wednesday, 18 November 2015 17:36

The only reason to use this wacky SC grading scale is to put your homeschool student on level with SC public school students for the lottery scholarships offered to SC public colleges & universities. But for that one purpose, it is a necessity.

The only reason to use this wacky SC grading scale is to put your homeschool student on level with SC public school students for the lottery scholarships offered to SC public colleges & universities. But for that one purpose, it is a necessity.
Guest - Alicia on Thursday, 19 November 2015 08:39

Actually, the SC homeschool organization to which I report requires this grading scale. They said that this scale is required to apply for state financial aid. It's worth the effort for scholarship money.

Actually, the SC homeschool organization to which I report requires this grading scale. They said that this scale is required to apply for state financial aid. It's worth the effort for scholarship money.
Guest - Lee (website) on Thursday, 19 November 2015 10:14

Of course you should obey your state law, AND use the system that is right for your child - especially if it's tied to scholarship money. My only point with bringing this up was really just "Wow! That's so complicated!" - there is a much easier way, so if you can avoid complications (without losing out on scholarships) then I'd make it easier on yourself.

This blog post explains why I'm not a fan of weighting grades:
http://www.thehomescholar.com/College-Prep/Why-i-do-not-recommend-weighting-grades.php

Blessings,
Lee

Of course you should obey your state law, AND use the system that is right for your child - especially if it's tied to scholarship money. My only point with bringing this up was really just "Wow! That's so complicated!" - there is a much easier way, so if you can avoid complications (without losing out on scholarships) then I'd make it easier on yourself. This blog post explains why I'm not a fan of weighting grades: http://www.thehomescholar.com/College-Prep/Why-i-do-not-recommend-weighting-grades.php Blessings, Lee
Guest - MPH on Tuesday, 29 March 2016 14:01

I'm a SC public school student who stumbled upon your article looking for my GPA scale, and just thought I clarify a few things.

First, the reason for the weighting of the scale is to give more GPA points for harder classes, and the reason each number gets its own decimal point is so that ties are prevented in class ranking, as well as giving more credit for higher percent grades (we rarely use letter grades)

Second, the difference between the the classes is difficulty level.
College prep, CP, classes are the basic standard class. They are what the average student takes. They are designed to teach to students at the basic level. (Yes, I know it's stupid these classes are called college prep when most of the students taking them are not college bound)
Honors classes are higher level and typically move at a faster pace and go more indepth than their CP counterparts. (For example you would take CP Biology or H Biology not both) Because these classes are harder, they are for more advanced students, and more GPA points are awarded.
AP classes earn college credit as well as high school credit, and are only taken as upperclassmen, usually as a 2nd level in a subject (example: AP Biology would be taken after getting a A in CP Bio or a B in H Bio)

It would be impossible for anyone to make it through High School with only AP classes, or even all H classes as many classes such a foreign languages, and most electives are only offered on the CP level.

Just thought I'd throw my 2 cents in, and if you have any questions let me know.

I'm a SC public school student who stumbled upon your article looking for my GPA scale, and just thought I clarify a few things. First, the reason for the weighting of the scale is to give more GPA points for harder classes, and the reason each number gets its own decimal point is so that ties are prevented in class ranking, as well as giving more credit for higher percent grades (we rarely use letter grades) Second, the difference between the the classes is difficulty level. College prep, CP, classes are the basic standard class. They are what the average student takes. They are designed to teach to students at the basic level. (Yes, I know it's stupid these classes are called college prep when most of the students taking them are not college bound) Honors classes are higher level and typically move at a faster pace and go more indepth than their CP counterparts. (For example you would take CP Biology or H Biology not both) Because these classes are harder, they are for more advanced students, and more GPA points are awarded. AP classes earn college credit as well as high school credit, and are only taken as upperclassmen, usually as a 2nd level in a subject (example: AP Biology would be taken after getting a A in CP Bio or a B in H Bio) It would be impossible for anyone to make it through High School with only AP classes, or even all H classes as many classes such a foreign languages, and most electives are only offered on the CP level. Just thought I'd throw my 2 cents in, and if you have any questions let me know.
Guest - Trena Balakrishnan on Wednesday, 22 June 2016 09:11

Actually, homeschoolers have to use this GPA conversion when applying for college scholarships. Glad to know it's wacky! I thought something had changed since my high school days when I saw it. I graduated in the Midwest and just thought things had changed with AP and Honors making the 4.0 not the "norm" scale anymore.

Actually, homeschoolers have to use this GPA conversion when applying for college scholarships. Glad to know it's wacky! I thought something had changed since my high school days when I saw it. I graduated in the Midwest and just thought things had changed with AP and Honors making the 4.0 not the "norm" scale anymore.
Guest - The Colonel on Wednesday, 22 June 2016 11:26

Couple of notes for you Lee,
1 - The chart you're using is out of date.
2 - Your information is misleading at best ad flat out wrong in some cases.
3 - If you don't know the difference between a CP and an AP class you probably should consider writing about something else.

I'm a huge supporter of private schooling / home schooling as well as an advocate for our public school here in South Carolina and recruit for the major university in the state.

Couple of notes for you Lee, 1 - The chart you're using is out of date. 2 - Your information is misleading at best ad flat out wrong in some cases. 3 - If you don't know the difference between a CP and an AP class you probably should consider writing about something else. I'm a huge supporter of private schooling / home schooling as well as an advocate for our public school here in South Carolina and recruit for the major university in the state.
Guest - The Colonel on Wednesday, 22 June 2016 11:26
Here's the correct chart: http://ed.sc.gov/newsroom/news-releases/10-point-uniform-grading-scale-approved-by-state-board-of-education/10-point-grading-scale-conversion-chart/
Guest - Lee (website) on Wednesday, 22 June 2016 12:01

This blog post was written a year ago, and I appreciate that there is a new grading scale available, although it remains just as long and complicated. This blog post explains why I think weighting grades is unnecessary in most cases: http://www.thehomescholar.com/College-Prep/Why-i-do-not-recommend-weighting-grades.php. Obviously homeschoolers should obey their state homeschool laws. They have an option of complying with their state public school laws as well. However, most colleges accept students from all states, where this law will not be in place, or become a factor in admission.
Blessings,
Lee

This blog post was written a year ago, and I appreciate that there is a new grading scale available, although it remains just as long and complicated. This blog post explains why I think weighting grades is unnecessary in most cases: http://www.thehomescholar.com/College-Prep/Why-i-do-not-recommend-weighting-grades.php. Obviously homeschoolers should obey their state homeschool laws. They have an option of complying with their state public school laws as well. However, most colleges accept students from all states, where this law will not be in place, or become a factor in admission. Blessings, Lee

"In a post on The HomeScholar, the Palmetto State’s grade point conversion chart is slammed as being 'wacky.'”

"In a post on The HomeScholar, the Palmetto State’s grade point conversion chart is slammed as being 'wacky.'”
Guest - Kim Andrysczyk (website) on Friday, 24 June 2016 06:29

It's also possible to include both the weighted and unweighted GPA's on the transcript. I say, open all the doors of opportunity possible. Since SC uses this "wacky" system, it makes sense to translate our grades to that scale, so we are better at demonstrating the equivalent values as our public schools do. Not necessary to make any gray hairs though--because there are several association directors who will assist in that calculation.

It's also possible to include both the weighted and unweighted GPA's on the transcript. I say, open all the doors of opportunity possible. Since SC uses this "wacky" system, it makes sense to translate our grades to that scale, so we are better at demonstrating the equivalent values as our public schools do. Not necessary to make any gray hairs though--because there are several association directors who will assist in that calculation.
Guest - SCAbby on Friday, 02 September 2016 09:43

Hi Lee,

Being a student partaking in public South Carolina studies, I would like to point out a few things. I myself have been educated through the South Carolina public school systems. While I couldn't honestly say that SC does not by any means have the best nor the most submerssive education, I will say that the grading by which we abide is not "wacky." Reading this article thoroughly offended me due to your lack of understanding. The reason why CP courses are awarded less merit than AP courses is because CP course are far more relaxed and easy-going than an AP course. An AP course entitles countless hours of studying and hard work during the class as well as outside the class in order to make even a passing grade. Hence why more points are given to more rigorous courses, obviously.

I would hope that the next time you post an article, you would research it, before ridiculing it.

Hi Lee, Being a student partaking in public South Carolina studies, I would like to point out a few things. I myself have been educated through the South Carolina public school systems. While I couldn't honestly say that SC does not by any means have the best nor the most submerssive education, I will say that the grading by which we abide is not "wacky." Reading this article thoroughly offended me due to your lack of understanding. The reason why CP courses are awarded less merit than AP courses is because CP course are far more relaxed and easy-going than an AP course. An AP course entitles countless hours of studying and hard work during the class as well as outside the class in order to make even a passing grade. Hence why more points are given to more rigorous courses, obviously. I would hope that the next time you post an article, you would research it, before ridiculing it.
Guest - Lee (website) on Friday, 02 September 2016 09:55

This article is written for homeschooling parents who do not need to play the weighting game. The point of the article is that all schools across the nation weight grades differently. In order to assess all applications equally, then, the first thing that colleges must do is to UN-weight the grades, and then re-weight them in the way preferred by the college. So it may make perfect sense why your grades are weighted that way in a public school, but that doesn't mean it's helpful for parents that are homeschooling.
Blessings,
Lee

This article is written for homeschooling parents who do not need to play the weighting game. The point of the article is that all schools across the nation weight grades differently. In order to assess all applications equally, then, the first thing that colleges must do is to UN-weight the grades, and then re-weight them in the way preferred by the college. So it may make perfect sense why your grades are weighted that way in a public school, but that doesn't mean it's helpful for parents that are homeschooling. Blessings, Lee
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