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Planning High School Courses: Part Two

high school courses

Planning High School Courses: Part Two



In this second half of planning high school courses for college preparation, we’ll consider what’s needed in the areas of Math, foreign language, PE, and electives.

Math
Math is such a cornerstone for other subjects, careers, and college majors that I believe it’s important to have four years of math. Most colleges want at least 3 years, and many want 4 years of math. They like to see kids moving forward in their math studies, so just teach your student consistently at their level, and keep moving. As long as you “do the next thing,” working on math at your student’s level, you can’t lose.

Foreign Language
Many colleges require a foreign language for admission. Most colleges demand two or three years of a single language, so the student becomes reasonably fluent. Whatever curriculum you choose, do a little bit every day. A daily 15 minute study period is much more effective than once a week for an hour. Use a foreign language curriculum designed for homeschoolers, so you aren’t expected to already know the language. Find a good curriculum, let the student learn independently, and check on their progress now and then.

Physical Education
Some children find it very easy to get the required two credits of PE, while others balk at physical exercise. Some unique ways to obtain physical education credits include yoga or weight lifting (try the YMCA). Your kids could also take CPR classes or study health. Some kids who “hate” PE will love swing-dancing or computer games requiring movement. Any physical activity that breaks a sweat counts!

Electives
Electives are credits that don’t fit under the other categories and can include driver’s education, typing, logic, and technology. Electives may be things your student does for fun. One of my kids loved chess and studied it for hours each week. Other students I know specialized in ornithology, mycology, economics, and musicology. Specialization is one of the benefits of homeschooling, so seize this opportunity!

How can you do it?
Parents may wonder how to teach children upper level math or foreign language when they don’t know the subject themselves. Find resources, such as video tutorials, at a homeschool convention or curriculum fair, where you can compare choices side-by-side. Remember, one of our goals is to teach our students to learn the way adults do - by teaching themselves.

For more help in planning your child’s high school courses, check out Part One and see my Planning High School Courses online training!



Read to see what others are saying about The HomeScholar Gold Care Club!
Time to Go College Visiting
Planning High School Courses: Part One
 

Comments 3

Guest - J W on Thursday, 15 March 2012 19:27

That's clear, thanks! I prefer teaching grammar in the context of the child's own writing because there's *so much* the child already has a handle on. Good to know I can show we're doing a formal study.

That's clear, thanks! I prefer teaching grammar in the context of the child's own writing because there's *so much* the child already has a handle on. Good to know I can show we're doing a formal study.
Guest - Lee (website) on Wednesday, 14 March 2012 10:10

Hi Joelle!
Latin Road provide the grammar and vocabulary of a high school English class. You still need to cover reading and writing. This program allow you to "skip" teaching high school grammar and vocabulary. So it's not double dipping to use this as your vocabulary and grammar study, because you'll have plenty of other stuff the makes up your English credit. Does that make sense?
Blessings,
Lee

Hi Joelle! Latin Road provide the grammar and vocabulary of a high school English class. You still need to cover reading and writing. This program allow you to "skip" teaching high school grammar and vocabulary. So it's not double dipping to use this as your vocabulary and grammar study, because you'll have plenty of other stuff the makes up your English credit. Does that make sense? Blessings, Lee
Guest - J W on Wednesday, 14 March 2012 07:10

My daughter and I are learning Latin side by side. We pretend we're taking a college course together, so I show her how to label her papers so that "Professor Scuttlebut" (our pretend prof) will know what he's grading. We're a good team - I'm terrible at memorizing, but she's quick, so she drills me. I know how languages work (this is my 4th foreign language), so she needs my experience in order to understand the concepts involved. Because there isn't a spoken component built into the curriculum, we make up hilarious stories and challenge each other in oral drills.

Just the other day we opened up my younger daughter's history book and started talking (in Latin) about the picture of the ancient Roman villa we found there!

The only concern I have is the curriculum (The Latin Road to English Grammar) doubles as an English grammar course. But I can't "double dip" on the transcript. Can I rely on the essay writing my daughter does? Especially as she wins high-placing ribbons every single year in Spring Fair for her essays?

My daughter and I are learning Latin side by side. We pretend we're taking a college course together, so I show her how to label her papers so that "Professor Scuttlebut" (our pretend prof) will know what he's grading. We're a good team - I'm terrible at memorizing, but she's quick, so she drills me. I know how languages work (this is my 4th foreign language), so she needs my experience in order to understand the concepts involved. Because there isn't a spoken component built into the curriculum, we make up hilarious stories and challenge each other in oral drills. Just the other day we opened up my younger daughter's history book and started talking (in Latin) about the picture of the ancient Roman villa we found there! The only concern I have is the curriculum (The Latin Road to English Grammar) doubles as an English grammar course. But I can't "double dip" on the transcript. Can I rely on the essay writing my daughter does? Especially as she wins high-placing ribbons every single year in Spring Fair for her essays?
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Friday, 16 April 2021

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