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Our Troubles are Better!

When homeschooling, I shared my worries and concerns about my children with others.  Some people would say, "That's not a concern!  I'LL tell you about a real problem child!"  Then they would share stories about teenagers that would curl your hair!  After years of hearing stories worse than mine, I came to a realization.

  • First:  my troubles were not as serious as other people's troubles

  • Second:  my troubles were still troubles to ME!


As homeschoolers, sometimes our problems are often on a different plane than others.  Sometimes our problems are less serious, non-life-threatening, without legal consequence.  Our problems are difficult, painful, and it's sometimes difficult to answer.  They are, however, some of the easier teenage problems in our society.

Keep up the good work!

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Comments 1

Guest - J W on Sunday, 09 November 2008 15:50

I'm glad you're humble enought to share, Lee. Thank you!

There have been times in my homeschool career where I wanted to burn all those magazines depicting smiling, Proverbs-quoting families wearing homeschool uniforms they sewed themselves. Sometimes being around children 24/7 is NOT a joy. Some of us have unimaginably heavy burdens to bear on top of the normal work of homeschool, and we sometimes stumble under the sheer weight of it all. We homeschoolers don't always like to admit these things. We tend to play up the advantages of homeschool both when we talk to skeptics and when we talk among ourselves. Some of those slick magazine articles can be terribly one-sided because the writers and/or interviewees are not willing to admit there is heartache and struggle. If such an admission is made, a quick Scriptural band-aid is offered. Sorry, but with the exception of the Holy Trinity, I don't like "heroes" who don't have "warts." I love the Bible because God doesn't shy away from telling us about people's character flaws, heartaches, and struggles. This is what helps make the Bible believable and instructive. We can learn from how God turned someone's life around. How would we learn to handle tough times and our own flaws if the people in the Bible never struggled, or if their problems were magically solved with a pithy saying?

I'm glad you're humble enought to share, Lee. Thank you! There have been times in my homeschool career where I wanted to burn all those magazines depicting smiling, Proverbs-quoting families wearing homeschool uniforms they sewed themselves. Sometimes being around children 24/7 is NOT a joy. Some of us have unimaginably heavy burdens to bear on top of the normal work of homeschool, and we sometimes stumble under the sheer weight of it all. We homeschoolers don't always like to admit these things. We tend to play up the advantages of homeschool both when we talk to skeptics and when we talk among ourselves. Some of those slick magazine articles can be terribly one-sided because the writers and/or interviewees are not willing to admit there is heartache and struggle. If such an admission is made, a quick Scriptural band-aid is offered. Sorry, but with the exception of the Holy Trinity, I don't like "heroes" who don't have "warts." I love the Bible because God doesn't shy away from telling us about people's character flaws, heartaches, and struggles. This is what helps make the Bible believable and instructive. We can learn from how God turned someone's life around. How would we learn to handle tough times and our own flaws if the people in the Bible never struggled, or if their problems were magically solved with a pithy saying?
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