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Ooops! Not Done With Math!

What do you do when you just aren't done with math before the year is done? Let me give you a few options, and you can decide which is best for your situation.

#Ooops! Not Done With Math! @TheHomeScholar


One Book In One Year is Impossible

You could measure math credits by counting hours spent on math. Some moms know their child can't complete a whole level each year. For them it makes sense to embrace the way God made your child, and give math credits not by textbook, but by the number of hours worked. In other words, it your young person worked at math for 45 minutes to an hour a day, then give credit for math, 1 credit per year. The title of the class is extra important in this option. You don't imply that your child got farther in the textbook than actually accomplished. To clarify that, you can call the class Algebra 1A, for 1 credit, for a whole year of work, for the first half of the textbook. Then call the class Algebra 1B for 1 credit, for a whole year of work the following year, for the second half of the textbook.

One Book Completed In Random Intervals

You could decide to give credit based on the completion date of each textbook. Some parents know the child is just working on their own time-table, being successful while only slightly slower than the average bear. Sometimes families will do year-round schooling, with math completion dates occurring at random intervals throughout the year. For them, it makes more sense to just give the credit on the month and year when each textbook was completed. So for this situation, math classes on the transcript might look like this:

  • Pre-algebra, 1 credit, completed 06/2014

  • Algebra 1, 1 credit, completed 12/2015

  • Geometry, 1 credit, completed 09/2016


That way is sometimes easier, I think, because there is less to keep track of other than completion dates. This may not be a good choice if a child is FAR behind, while still working hard all day, because they get short-changed for all the work they did just to get 1/2 way through a textbook.

Measure by Semester,  Not by Year

You could decide to embrace the random start and stop time of your homeschool classes. Some parents prefer to give grades each semester, rather than each year, because the timing is just too difficult to figure out when each class begins and ends otherwise. If you do that, then each 1/2 textbook you can enter half the number of usual credits and give a grade. So on the semester system, a math book is still 1 credit, but each semester is 1/2 credit. I to have some transcript templates with semester grades available for you to look at, but templates are usually just by semester or by year. You can still add one class at a time that ends at the semester, if you like. This works well if your child starts and stops many classes at somewhat random intervals. Every 6 months, update the transcript with what was completed in the previous 6 months.

Over-Picky Parents Expecting Perfection

You may need to just lighten up, and your child can complete a math book per year. Other moms are just expecting more than a public school expects. In other words, expecting a child who struggles to complete every single problem in the book, from beginning to end isn't always the best choice. After all, a child only needs enough practice to learn, not all the practice problems that are provided in the universe. And homeschoolers don't need to complete all the chapters in every textbook, either. If you complete 75-80% of the curriculum, then it's done. So maybe Algebra 1 or Geometry will be done sooner than expected.
If you need more help, I have some math articles to encourage you!

9 Ways to Actually Get Math Done This Year
High School Math Without the Moaning


What do you think? Which method would you choose?

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Comments 2

Guest - Lisa on Saturday, 25 July 2015 16:00

My daughter worked all year on geometry and only made it through the first 4 chapters. She just wasn't getting it. We are planning on a consumer math course for next year (senior). Do I put on her transcript a description of the chapters that were done and call it Introduction to Geometry?

My daughter worked all year on geometry and only made it through the first 4 chapters. She just wasn't getting it. We are planning on a consumer math course for next year (senior). Do I put on her transcript a description of the chapters that were done and call it Introduction to Geometry?
Guest - Lee (website) on Monday, 27 July 2015 10:03

If she only did the first four chapters, that may not be enough for even 1/2 credit. You can put it on the transcript as a Introduction to Geometry, or call if Geometry 1A - just be sure she did enough work to call it 1/2 credit. Four chapters isn't very much, and I don't know what book you were using, so this is just a guestimate on my part.
Lee

If she only did the first four chapters, that may not be enough for even 1/2 credit. You can put it on the transcript as a Introduction to Geometry, or call if Geometry 1A - just be sure she did enough work to call it 1/2 credit. Four chapters isn't very much, and I don't know what book you were using, so this is just a guestimate on my part. Lee
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Wednesday, 11 December 2019

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