Search - Quix
Search - Content
Search - News Feeds
Search - Easy Blog
Search - Tags

March is College Visit Time


 

College Visit Time

If you’re a parent of a homeschooled teenager, you’ve probably been thinking about college for a while now! As you and your student prepare for that not-so-far-away event, now is the time to start visiting colleges that interest you.  Deciding which colleges to consider is a big job—and you should take your time doing it, since your student will be spending four years of their life in this place.  For help in the process of selecting and visiting colleges, my online training course, Finding a College is a perfect place to start.  I recommend you visit colleges in the spring of junior year or earlier. Colleges can look very similar on paper, with brochures full of sunny days and beautiful fall leaves.  Even when pictures and statistics look the same, you really don’t know what a college is like until you visit.

Let them know you’re coming
Whether you visit a campus on a special preview day, a regular school day or for an overnight visit, you should sign up with the Admissions department and let them know you are coming.  It’s very easy.  Most college websites will have a place to register for a visit.  Don’t miss this opportunity to let colleges know you’re interested in them!  Some colleges keep records of how often prospective students come to visit.  If you decide a particular college may be “the one” and you’ve visited them four times, they will look at this very favorably and value you more because of it.

Meet the admission representative
When visiting a prospective college, your student should dress neatly and be clean, pleasant and charming.  The school will likely be watching you just as closely as you are watching them.  Students should make a point to talk to the college admission staff.  It’s easy for parents to take control here and run the show, but this is actually a mistake.  This time your student should do most of the interaction.  It is, of course, important for parents to find out the college’s policy for homeschooled applicants, and determine what sort of records they need from your homeschool.  Many colleges treat homeschoolers the same as all other applicants, while others will have certain hoops that homeschoolers have to jump through, such as testing or something unique to that college.  It’s important to know this information up front, so make sure to ask during your visit.



When you are applying for colleges, you will need a great homeschool transcript.  The good news is you can “do-it-yourself” and save thousands. Discover the Total Transcript Solution.
Setting the Records Straight receives a RAVE revie...
Homeschooling High School - How to Get it All Done
 

Comments

No comments made yet. Be the first to submit a comment
Already Registered? Login Here
Guest
Sunday, 11 April 2021

By accepting you will be accessing a service provided by a third-party external to https://www.homehighschoolhelp.com/

More Encouraging Posts

  • How to Motivate Homeschool Teens and Rouse Slug-Slow Students

    One mom jokingly told me that her son's spirit animal was a sloth. We had a good giggle over that one, because I remember what it's like to try to motivate homeschool teens . And frankly, misery loves company!

    Misery also craves solutions. That's where this book comes in.  

    Need to light a fire under your unmotivated teen? Learn expert

    Read More
  • College Application Lexicon

    College application has it's own unique vocabulary.  As you look toward college admission, you'll notice you have many different choices on how to apply.  Here are the NACAC definitions of terms for different kinds of application plans.  If you need a primer on what "application" means, this blog post is for you.

    College Application Lexicon

    ADMISSION TERMS PER NACAC

    Non-Restrictive Application Plans: All

    Read More
  • Homeschooling Teenagers: Choose Your Battles

    There are challenges with homeschooling teenagers. A resistant 16-year-old can certainly have an attitude, at times, that makes you want to throw in the towel! It's hard to be a Christian parent homeschooling a resistant teen who doesn't want to homeschool anymore. It may seem like an uphill battle, but there are ways to find the right path for your Read More
  • Super Senior or Delayed Graduation: The 5 Year Plan

    When deciding whether or not you'll have your student do a 5th year of high school, or a Super Senior year, you'll need to weigh the desires and maturity of your student against their age and abilities.

    It's normal for a child to graduate high school between the ages of 17 and 20. For many parents, that means that you can

    Read More
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10
  • 11
  • 12
  • 13
  • 14
  • 15
  • 16
  • 17
  • 18
  • 19
  • 20
  • 21
  • 22
  • 23
  • 24
  • 25
  • 26
  • 27
  • 28
  • 29
  • 30
  • 31
  • 32
  • 33
  • 34
  • 35
  • 36
  • 37
  • 38
  • 39
  • 40
  • 41
  • 42
  • 43
  • 44
  • 45
  • 46
  • 47
  • 48