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How to Earn $1600 an Hour Writing Course Descriptions

 

How to Earn $1600 an Hour Writing Course Descriptions


If your homeschool family is struggling to make the time to write course descriptions, this might be a good blog post to share with your spouse.

If you had the perfect job, working from home, loving your children, how much could you earn per hour, do you think? Traci found out that her job as a homeschool parent was actually earning her WELL over minimum wage. Can you believe it? $1600/hour for working on her homeschool course descriptions!
 “I just had to write to let you know that my daughter received the Regent's Scholarship for a $40,700 annual award.  I am still in shock daily. Of course this is after hours and hours of work on both of our parts, my daughter writing countless essays and filling out applications, and me writing course descriptions.  But we figured out that even if we spent 100 hours in the process, we were actually making about $1600 an hour! I cannot thank you enough for all the direction you have given me over the past few years.  Honestly, the college application process has proven to be one of the most challenging things I have ever done.  It challenged my faith and sanity.  I cannot imagine trying to do it on my own.  Thank you for choosing to spend your post-schooling years helping others! The prospect of homeschooling high school IS scary, but looking back, the blessing of intimacy I now share with my daughter by having spent these past  four years together was worth it.  Thank you for helping!

~ Sincerely, Traci Minor

Why would you share this information with your spouse? Because writing course descriptions is like changing a baby's diaper. It's a dirty job, but somebody has got to do it. If you and your beloved can just agree that course descriptions are important, and encourage one another, then maybe you can have the perfect job working from home too, and earn HUGE amounts of cold, hard cash for college.

Here are some resources to get your started!

Learn more about creating awesome course descriptions with this FREE class.

Homeschool Records That Open Doors


 If you prefer, try this coordinating Coffee Break Book for $3 on Kindle.

Comprehensive Homeschool Records: Put Your Best Foot Forward to Win College Admission and Scholarships


 If you need a book you can hold in your hands, try this $24.95 paperback.

Setting the Records Straight: How to Craft Homeschool Transcripts and Course Descriptions for College Admission and Scholarships


 I'll be glad to hold your hand through the whole college admission process.

Join The HomeScholar Gold Care Club


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Comments 2

Guest - Beth on Thursday, 06 November 2014 13:05

Lee,
I have what may seem like an odd question. I would like to know how families pay for the remaining college expenses (room/board, books, fees, etc.) even if they manage to get big scholarships for their student. We already know that our son could get tuition paid at one college, but with the other costs running $11,000 per year (not counting travel expenses to the other side of the country), my husband says we don't have the money to pay for all/most of it and he doesn't want our son to graduate with $40k+ debt. We have two more kids after him to put through college, who are not as likely to get the big money. We are very picky about what schools we're looking at, because our faith is important to us and we want our son in the right college environment.

Do you have any advice to offer on this?

Thanks,
Beth

Lee, I have what may seem like an odd question. I would like to know how families pay for the remaining college expenses (room/board, books, fees, etc.) even if they manage to get big scholarships for their student. We already know that our son could get tuition paid at one college, but with the other costs running $11,000 per year (not counting travel expenses to the other side of the country), my husband says we don't have the money to pay for all/most of it and he doesn't want our son to graduate with $40k+ debt. We have two more kids after him to put through college, who are not as likely to get the big money. We are very picky about what schools we're looking at, because our faith is important to us and we want our son in the right college environment. Do you have any advice to offer on this? Thanks, Beth
Guest - Assistant to The HomeScholar on Thursday, 06 November 2014 15:20

It's not an odd question, Beth.
I think we all wonder about that! In her article, Homeschooling College with CLEP Lee says "Homeschooling college [with CLEP tests] can save a lot of money". In the same article, Lee tells us how to "report your student’s CLEP scores to the colleges they’re interested in applying to." She warns, "it may result in $100 in fees, but because these scores ultimately translate into thousands of dollars in college credits." If you haven't yet, you may want to pick up Lee's Kindle books: Getting the BIG Scholarships and College Scholarships for High School Credit.
Robin
Assistant to The HomeScholar

It's not an odd question, Beth. I think we all wonder about that! In her article, Homeschooling College with CLEP Lee says "Homeschooling college [with CLEP tests] can save a lot of money". In the same article, Lee tells us how to "report your student’s CLEP scores to the colleges they’re interested in applying to." She warns, "it may result in $100 in fees, but because these scores ultimately translate into thousands of dollars in college credits." If you haven't yet, you may want to pick up Lee's Kindle books: Getting the BIG Scholarships and College Scholarships for High School Credit. Robin Assistant to The HomeScholar
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Wednesday, 19 February 2020

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