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Homeschool Physics - An Apologia Success Story

It happened again.  I just found Kevin reading his Apologia Physics book.  For fun.  He's a junior in engineering school, got straight A's last quarter in all his engineering classes.  And he reads his Apologia Physics book for fun.  He is a "little nervous" about next quarter because he is taking quantum mechanics, so he wanted to review Apologia again before the quarter starts.  Good investment, that book.  Apologia Physics
Quote of the day:

"Getting good grades is easy, it's LEARNING that is hard"

~ Kevin.

He tells me that there are lots of kids who will work the system to get good grades.  Kevin says he's trying to really learn.  I'm so proud of him!

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I have come to the conclusion that far too many parents quit homeschooling their children for exactly the wrong reason.  That reason is FEAR!   When I started The HomeScholar, all I wanted in the whole world was to make a difference in the lives of regular homeschool parents.  Parents who, like me, were filled with BIG questions about homeschooling high school:


  • "Can we teach high school subjects?"

  • "Am I qualified?"

  • "Will colleges accept my homeschool student?"


Questions and doubts like these drive many parents away from homeschooling high school and back into the world of private or public school classrooms. But I have good news!  You Can Be Strong and Confident!

The HomeScholar Gold Care Club launches on April 21.  You are going to love the strength and confidence you will feel as a member!!
Enter to Win Sonlight Curriculum
College Application Lexicon
 

Comments 7

Guest - Julieanne (website) on Saturday, 08 February 2014 13:04

I'm nervous about Apologia Chemistry this next school year - and we may end up using a different text for Chemistry than Apologia. My dad, who is an engineer, mathematician, and scientist read through the Apologia Chemistry book and felt that it makes the same mistake that many modern chemistry texts make: tons of memorization of unnecessary material that most modern scientists just look up in tables or books or online. He feels that it is taught in a way that makes it extremely difficult to learn chemistry well unless a student is completely math/chemistry minded. He's loved all of the other Apologia texts that we've done, so now I need to try to figure out which text we'll be using next year. Hmm.

I'm nervous about Apologia Chemistry this next school year - and we may end up using a different text for Chemistry than Apologia. My dad, who is an engineer, mathematician, and scientist read through the Apologia Chemistry book and felt that it makes the same mistake that many modern chemistry texts make: tons of memorization of unnecessary material that most modern scientists just look up in tables or books or online. :) He feels that it is taught in a way that makes it extremely difficult to learn chemistry well unless a student is completely math/chemistry minded. He's loved all of the other Apologia texts that we've done, so now I need to try to figure out which text we'll be using next year. Hmm.
Guest - Annie Kate (website) on Monday, 23 December 2013 15:52

Yes, Lee, Apologia Physics is phenomenal! But, as you said, Apologia products are not for those who have trouble memorizing (biology) or thinking clearly (physics and chemistry).

I have written extensively about Apologia high school science, and most of the articles can be accessed from the one in this link: http://anniekateshomeschoolreviews.com/2013/06/tweaking-apologia-advanced-chemistry-and-physics-for-grade-12/ I hope these practical discussions will help some of your readers figure out how to use Apologia in their homeschools.

Yes, Lee, Apologia Physics is phenomenal! But, as you said, Apologia products are not for those who have trouble memorizing (biology) or thinking clearly (physics and chemistry). I have written extensively about Apologia high school science, and most of the articles can be accessed from the one in this link: http://anniekateshomeschoolreviews.com/2013/06/tweaking-apologia-advanced-chemistry-and-physics-for-grade-12/ I hope these practical discussions will help some of your readers figure out how to use Apologia in their homeschools.
Guest - J W on Thursday, 09 April 2009 20:11

Oh, man, I'd be up a creek if I weren't taking French along with my daughters. They'd plot and scheme and crack jokes, and I wouldn't have the foggiest clue :-)

As it is... we *do* have a dictionary, and they do memorize things faster than I do... so I suppose they'll be plotting and scheming and cracking jokes before too long anyway :-)

My poor husband... He just learned how to speak "Woman," now he has to deal with three females speaking in a foreign language. He tries to hide in his den, but quite often we invade his space to practice and show off.

"Where is our father?
"He's downstairs, in his 'cave.'"
"I love my father."
"I love my father too."
"Goodbye, father! We love you!"

The bemused look he gets on his face is funny. He always appreciates it when the girls translate afterward.

Oh, and my speech-delayed, socially challenged daughter spontaneously asked the ladies at the German deli how to place our meat order in German the other day. She obviously wanted to move beyond hello, please, thank you, and goodbye (which we learned from the same ladies). Obviously she's relishing the challenges that foreign languages offer, and she's gaining confidence dealing with people of a different cultural background and generation! No way would she gain that kind of confidence and curiosity sitting in a special-ed class day after day! Years ago, no one would have told me that by age 9 she'd be doing this!!!

Oh, man, I'd be up a creek if I weren't taking French along with my daughters. They'd plot and scheme and crack jokes, and I wouldn't have the foggiest clue :-) As it is... we *do* have a dictionary, and they do memorize things faster than I do... so I suppose they'll be plotting and scheming and cracking jokes before too long anyway :-) My poor husband... He just learned how to speak "Woman," now he has to deal with three females speaking in a foreign language. He tries to hide in his den, but quite often we invade his space to practice and show off. "Where is our father? "He's downstairs, in his 'cave.'" "I love my father." "I love my father too." "Goodbye, father! We love you!" The bemused look he gets on his face is funny. He always appreciates it when the girls translate afterward. Oh, and my speech-delayed, socially challenged daughter spontaneously asked the ladies at the German deli how to place our meat order in German the other day. She obviously wanted to move beyond hello, please, thank you, and goodbye (which we learned from the same ladies). Obviously she's relishing the challenges that foreign languages offer, and she's gaining confidence dealing with people of a different cultural background and generation! No way would she gain that kind of confidence and curiosity sitting in a special-ed class day after day! Years ago, no one would have told me that by age 9 she'd be doing this!!!
Guest - Lee (website) on Thursday, 09 April 2009 12:02

I do like Apologia and recommend it regularly, but it's not for everyone. I surprised myself yesterday during a consultation when I actually recommended AGAINST Apologia! The mom had a student with some learning disabilities, and there is so much memorization in Apologia Biology it would have been very frustrating for the kid. It's important to look for good curriculum, but it also have to fit your child. Having "just" good curriculum won't work, and having "just" a fit (with a rotten curriculum) won't work well either. They sort of have to work together, you know?
Blessings,
Lee

I do like Apologia and recommend it regularly, but it's not for everyone. I surprised myself yesterday during a consultation when I actually recommended AGAINST Apologia! The mom had a student with some learning disabilities, and there is so much memorization in Apologia Biology it would have been very frustrating for the kid. It's important to look for good curriculum, but it also have to fit your child. Having "just" good curriculum won't work, and having "just" a fit (with a rotten curriculum) won't work well either. They sort of have to work together, you know? Blessings, Lee
Guest - Lisa (website) on Thursday, 09 April 2009 11:55

That's neat how homeschoolers can focus on learning rather than simply getting a good grade.

I've heard good things about Apologia science and a friend lent me some Apologia books for the younger grades. I loved physics and look forward to learning it again with the boys.

That's neat how homeschoolers can focus on learning rather than simply getting a good grade. I've heard good things about Apologia science and a friend lent me some Apologia books for the younger grades. I loved physics and look forward to learning it again with the boys.
Guest - Lee (website) on Thursday, 09 April 2009 11:13

Hi Renee,
I found physics intimidating too. When they had their junior high physics unit in "Rainbow Science" I was completely in over my head. It's weird, because I love math & science, but I'd never taken ANY physics in high school or college. Every time we talked about physics concepts in nursing school I felt inadequate and... well... stupid. So I didn't feel like I "liked" physics, and I certainly didn't understand it.

I handed the boys the book. They read it on their own. They did the experiments without me. They did a lab write-up and I read it. If it made sense to me, they got a good grade, if not, they got a bad grade :-) They took the tests, and like with calculus, I looked at the answer key to make sure the answers were exactly 100% the same. We didn't have a tutor. They called the toll free number two or three times, but not often.

You don't have to learn physics. Your CHILD is responsible to learn it. If he loves engineering, he's going to be learning a lot of other subjects on his own, right? So this year, you're going to teach him how to do that. You're going to teach him how to learn that subject on his own. And you know, if he loves engineering, it will come pretty naturally to him.

Blessings,
Lee

Hi Renee, I found physics intimidating too. When they had their junior high physics unit in "Rainbow Science" I was completely in over my head. It's weird, because I love math & science, but I'd never taken ANY physics in high school or college. Every time we talked about physics concepts in nursing school I felt inadequate and... well... stupid. So I didn't feel like I "liked" physics, and I certainly didn't understand it. I handed the boys the book. They read it on their own. They did the experiments without me. They did a lab write-up and I read it. If it made sense to me, they got a good grade, if not, they got a bad grade :-) They took the tests, and like with calculus, I looked at the answer key to make sure the answers were exactly 100% the same. We didn't have a tutor. They called the toll free number two or three times, but not often. You don't have to learn physics. Your CHILD is responsible to learn it. If he loves engineering, he's going to be learning a lot of other subjects on his own, right? So this year, you're going to teach him how to do that. You're going to teach him how to learn that subject on his own. And you know, if he loves engineering, it will come pretty naturally to him. Blessings, Lee
Guest - Renee G on Thursday, 09 April 2009 04:39

For the first time I am scared of a subject - Physics.
I wasn't afraid of Biology or Chemistry (I had those in high school and the latter even in college). I wasn't afraid of Pre-Calculus (had that in high school). I did send dd to CC for Calculus but that was mainly because of difficulties findnig an at home program (neither TT nor MUS has Calculus).... but here I am at Physics with a son that has an interest in Engineering..... sigh. I need to talk to my neighbor a few doors up to see what his thoughts are.... he's an engineer.

For the first time I am scared of a subject - Physics. I wasn't afraid of Biology or Chemistry (I had those in high school and the latter even in college). I wasn't afraid of Pre-Calculus (had that in high school). I did send dd to CC for Calculus but that was mainly because of difficulties findnig an at home program (neither TT nor MUS has Calculus).... but here I am at Physics with a son that has an interest in Engineering..... sigh. I need to talk to my neighbor a few doors up to see what his thoughts are.... he's an engineer.
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