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Homeschool Parent = Counselor+Mentor+Advisor

Who does the "applying" to colleges these days?  The parents, or the child?  When I was a senior, I filled out all of the applications.  My parents had no involvement at all, except for stating income.  For example, when you brought in all of your records to the college interview, was your son even there?  Was he involved?

Dear Susan,

The student does all the applying.  The parent plays the role of the guidance counselor, mentor, and high school advisor. Your parents didn't have to be the guidance counselor if you were in school, and that's why they were completely out of the loop.

Parents are GREAT guidance counselors, though.  The love for their child can ensure success, and their careful consideration will help prevent any major slips.  So when you are looking at college applications, it is the student who does the applying: filling the forms, asking for the recommendation letters, writing the essays.  It's the guidance counselor (you) will give them guide them through the process, providing opportunities for college fairs, and college visits, and providing "timely reminders" each step of the way.  For more information about the process, I recommend the video "Finding a College".

When we planned our college visit, I made contact with the college and asked the college adviser what they would like me to bring.  They asked for "all" my homeschool records.  We met as a family with the admission adviser, and we were all in the room.  He never asked to see my homeschool records, although he did look very appreciative when I brought them.  Later in the college visit, my children went to a classroom visit, and I remained at the advising office.  I wanted them to know that my children were not so sheltered that I had to go to class with them.  When they were in class, I went in to the advisers office to talk specifically about my homeschool record keeping.  It seemed like an administrative task that a high school would normally handle, not a student.  That is when I gently suggested that they might enjoy actually LOOKING at the records I had brought with me!

This is the season for spring college fairs, and it's a great time to start that whole process with your own family!

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Comments 3

Guest - Lee (website) on Thursday, 05 March 2009 09:56

Thanks for your comments, Joelle. I'll miss you at choir tonight!
Blessings,
Lee

Thanks for your comments, Joelle. I'll miss you at choir tonight! Blessings, Lee
Guest - J W on Thursday, 05 March 2009 09:49

Whoops! That's Texas schools end around late May, not "by May."

Whoops! That's Texas schools end around late May, not "by May."
Guest - J W on Thursday, 05 March 2009 09:45

There's also room for a parent to step in when there's just too much red tape.

There were, and, last I knew (2005) differences between when Texas schools end and when Washington schools end. Texas schools usually let out by May, and Washington Schools run well in to June. UT Austin typically starts fall semester the last week of August. My school district had to get meaningful records together a lot sooner than they usually did for most graduating seniors. UT Austin had to accept what my school district sent, even though it meant that a substantial amount of data from my senior year was missing.

There was the additional wrinkle that I would be gone most of my shortened summer on an overseas exchange trip that I had competed for and *won* on academic merit. No way was I going to stay stateside and jump through bureaucratic hoops.

It was a nightmare. Bureaucrats from both my high school and the University whined, complained, and dragged their feet. There was no way I could sort it all out and still maintain my GPA. That's when my Mom stepped up to the plate. And boy, am I glad she did!

There's also room for a parent to step in when there's just too much red tape. There were, and, last I knew (2005) differences between when Texas schools end and when Washington schools end. Texas schools usually let out by May, and Washington Schools run well in to June. UT Austin typically starts fall semester the last week of August. My school district had to get meaningful records together a lot sooner than they usually did for most graduating seniors. UT Austin had to accept what my school district sent, even though it meant that a substantial amount of data from my senior year was missing. There was the additional wrinkle that I would be gone most of my shortened summer on an overseas exchange trip that I had competed for and *won* on academic merit. No way was I going to stay stateside and jump through bureaucratic hoops. It was a nightmare. Bureaucrats from both my high school and the University whined, complained, and dragged their feet. There was no way I could sort it all out and still maintain my GPA. That's when my Mom stepped up to the plate. And boy, am I glad she did!
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