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College Scholarships for Homeschoolers

College Scholarships for Homeschoolers


Lets play the "College website" game!

college scholarships for homeschoolers


Check out this college's explanation of academic merit scholarships online: UVU Academic Merit Scholarships.

college scholarships for homeschoolers

 What can you learn?


First, their financial aid is DIRECTLY tied to ACT scores. By studying for the test, you can save thousands of dollars.


Second, notice how easily they can convert an SAT score to an ACT score. Colleges are used to seeing both tests.


Third, GPA matters. Although this college doesn't put high school GPA on their grid, many colleges do. Notice how GPA and ACT scores relate. See how the two pieces of data mirror each other? Higher GPAs are correlated with higher ACT scores. That's why a great homeschool GPA is quite reasonable if you have high test scores.


Finally, notice how students don't have to be perfect in order to get great scholarships. An ACT score of 22 is about average (although it varies from year to year), and it still earns the 'Distinguished Scholarship'. Average students CAN earn merit scholarships.


What can you do with this information? What are the take-aways from today's game?


1. Provide a transcript with grades.


2. Make sure your children study for the ACT or SAT test.


What are you doing to ensure your children earn college scholarships for homeschoolers? Please share!



Please note: This post was originally published in April 2011 and has been revamped and updated for accuracy and comprehensiveness.

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Comments 6

Guest - Janice on Wednesday, 06 April 2011 22:14

Lee you're just a little high on the average/normal ACT. For last year, if I remember correctly it was 20.1 and that included the homeschool scores, so public school kids would actually be just a little lower than that. My two daughters excelled like your sons, but my sons haven't done nearly as well, and didn't want to study for the test, especially the younger son. So no scholarships for them, though one could have, if he had just applied early enough.

Lee you're just a little high on the average/normal ACT. For last year, if I remember correctly it was 20.1 and that included the homeschool scores, so public school kids would actually be just a little lower than that. My two daughters excelled like your sons, but my sons haven't done nearly as well, and didn't want to study for the test, especially the younger son. So no scholarships for them, though one could have, if he had just applied early enough.
Guest - Lee (website) on Thursday, 07 April 2011 05:54

Hi Janice,
It varies every year, and it's a little hard to keep track of. Also, different news reports will cite a state average, rather than a national average. For 2010 the average national ACT score was 21, with some MA getting an average of 24, and KY got 19.4. My guess is your score quote is from your state. I used to quote 20 all the time, actually, and someone corrected me, LOL! It wasn't until then that I began to realize how complicated it is! Here is the link to the report:
http://www.act.org/news/data/10/states.html?utm_campaign=cccr10&utm_source=data&utm_medium=web

I love your comment about how he could have had scholarships if he had just applied early enough - so true, isn't it? And it can be SO hard to convince them to do things during senior year, too! That's why I recommend people start their application on the first day of senior year. It doesn't solve ALL the problems inherent in senior year, but it can help a bit!

Thanks so much for your comment! Great insights!
Blessings,
Lee

Hi Janice, It varies every year, and it's a little hard to keep track of. Also, different news reports will cite a state average, rather than a national average. For 2010 the average national ACT score was 21, with some MA getting an average of 24, and KY got 19.4. My guess is your score quote is from your state. I used to quote 20 all the time, actually, and someone corrected me, LOL! It wasn't until then that I began to realize how complicated it is! Here is the link to the report: http://www.act.org/news/data/10/states.html?utm_campaign=cccr10&utm_source=data&utm_medium=web I love your comment about how he could have had scholarships if he had just applied early enough - so true, isn't it? And it can be SO hard to convince them to do things during senior year, too! That's why I recommend people start their application on the first day of senior year. It doesn't solve ALL the problems inherent in senior year, but it can help a bit! Thanks so much for your comment! Great insights! Blessings, Lee
Guest - Jocelyn on Monday, 13 January 2014 08:00

Hi Lee,
It's so great that you are bringing this to people's attention! I also noticed some colleges ask how many honors classes you have taken to estimate the academic scholarships they will give you. With our being overseas and not having access to AP or CLEP exams, I didn't know if I could call my daughter's course work honors so I didn't make the distinction. My niece applied to the same college, they had the same SAT score but she was able to list several honors classes which also raised her GPA in American public school. My niece received an additional $5,000 from the university loosely based on those factors. So I would add: make sure to distinguish honors classes where possible. I don't know if there is a 'rule' about that which doesn't use the AP or CLEP exams as documentation. Likely just a 'living overseas' problem too. Thanks for all you insights!!

Hi Lee, It's so great that you are bringing this to people's attention! I also noticed some colleges ask how many honors classes you have taken to estimate the academic scholarships they will give you. With our being overseas and not having access to AP or CLEP exams, I didn't know if I could call my daughter's course work honors so I didn't make the distinction. My niece applied to the same college, they had the same SAT score but she was able to list several honors classes which also raised her GPA in American public school. My niece received an additional $5,000 from the university loosely based on those factors. So I would add: make sure to distinguish honors classes where possible. I don't know if there is a 'rule' about that which doesn't use the AP or CLEP exams as documentation. Likely just a 'living overseas' problem too. Thanks for all you insights!!
Guest - Assistant to The HomeScholar on Wednesday, 13 July 2016 15:39

Hi Jocelyn,
It's good to get your perspective on all of it as well! Thank you for sharing your experience!
Blessings,
Robin
Assistant to The HomeScholar

Hi Jocelyn, It's good to get your perspective on all of it as well! Thank you for sharing your experience! Blessings, Robin Assistant to The HomeScholar
Guest - Cherlye Collins on Wednesday, 13 July 2016 13:23

I have a 12 year old daughter that I have been home-schooling since she was 8 years old, she wants to be a doctor or a scientist. This past school year (2015-2016), she finished both the 6th and 7th Grade levels, this school year (2016-2017) she will be in the 8th Grade and we have been talking about going to college. She has already begun to study for her SAT and ACT tests and is pushing herself to become a straight "A" student (currently she's on the A B Honor Roll). We are very interested in learning more about the Scholarships for students who are home schooled and looking forward to getting started on her future.

I have a 12 year old daughter that I have been home-schooling since she was 8 years old, she wants to be a doctor or a scientist. This past school year (2015-2016), she finished both the 6th and 7th Grade levels, this school year (2016-2017) she will be in the 8th Grade and we have been talking about going to college. She has already begun to study for her SAT and ACT tests and is pushing herself to become a straight "A" student (currently she's on the A B Honor Roll). We are very interested in learning more about the Scholarships for students who are home schooled and looking forward to getting started on her future.
Guest - Assistant to The HomeScholar on Wednesday, 13 July 2016 15:49

Hi Cherlye,
I think that's our favorite thing about homeschooling! You know your daughter best, and you can "get started on her future" whenever you think she's ready. Lee has written two books on acquiring scholarships for high school credit. Her Coffee Break Book on the topic is a quick, easy read: College Scholarships for High School Credit: Learn and Earn With This Two-for-One Strategy!
And for a more in-depth book: Setting the Records Straight: How to Craft Homeschool Transcripts and Course Descriptions for College Admission and Scholarships
Blessings,
Robin
Assistant to The HomeScholar

Hi Cherlye, I think that's our favorite thing about homeschooling! You know your daughter best, and you can "get started on her future" whenever you think she's ready. Lee has written two books on acquiring scholarships for high school credit. Her Coffee Break Book on the topic is a quick, easy read: College Scholarships for High School Credit: Learn and Earn With This Two-for-One Strategy! And for a more in-depth book: Setting the Records Straight: How to Craft Homeschool Transcripts and Course Descriptions for College Admission and Scholarships Blessings, Robin Assistant to The HomeScholar
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