Search - Quix
Search - Content
Search - News Feeds
Search - Easy Blog
Search - Tags

Class Title for Piano

How do you choose a class title when nobody tells you what the class title should be? There are so many options for class titles. Even more so when you are talking about a skill that is repeated in high school.

piano.jpg


Lisa asked me how to name her piano class on a transcript.  The easy answer? You can do it any way that you want to, because all schools would do it differently.

So many options. So few rule. You get to choose!  Here are some options.

 

  • You could just say "Piano" each year, with no numbers attached to it at all: "Piano."

  • You could call the class beginning, intermediate, or advanced: "Beginning Piano."

  • You could use the grade number for the class title: "Piano 9" taken in 9th grade.

  • You could use the year in high school for the title; "Piano 1" taken in 9th grade.

  • You could use the number of years of practice: "Piano 7" after 7 years of practice.

  • You could use random Roman Numerals for added fun: "Piano IV"


 

Here is what I did. Originally I planned to use Piano 1, 2, or 3 depending on what year he was in high school - Piano 1 for freshman year. Later in high school, my son competed in piano, and his adjudication forms gave an official piano skill level.  I can't remember if it was 7 or whatever, when he was a junior. So that was the year I gave him Piano 7 - the year he was adjudicated during competition at that level. Then I counted backwards, and the previous year was Piano 6, the year before that was Piano 5.

Bottom line: there is no right or wrong answer, so you can do what you want to do.  In fact, I did a quick check of some schools to see what they call their classes, and here is what I came  up with.

High schools have a variety of titles they use for a piano class. It's interesting to think about these being taught in a classroom setting.  I'm so thankful my shy child, less gifted in music, didn't need to take piano in front of other children. But here are the titles some schools use:

 

  • North Attleboro High School: "Piano Class"

  • Nicolet High School: "Beginning Piano" or "Intermediate Piano"

  • Vrevard Music Center: "High School Piano"

  • UNC Chapel Hill calls high school classes: "Group Piano IV" or "Group Piano V"


 

The Roman numerals were determined by age, generally.

Colleges had a variety of words and number for piano. I found this one amusing from Easterm Kentucky University.

 

  • MUS 109: Introductory Class Piano

  • MUS 110:  Beginning Class Piano I

  • MUS 111:  Beginning Class Piano II

  • MUS 112:  Piano I


 

In this case, introductory comes first, then beginning, and then the students have finally achieved the esteemed class title of "Piano 1."

For some classes, there are no right or wrong answers. You get to choose! Knock yourself out! Feel the power! You are the homeschool parent!

signature

If you would like to talk to Lee about your own class titles consider joining the Gold Care Club. As a member you can talk with Lee on the phone on a weekly basis!
College Admission Classes at a College Fair
Coping with Changes to the SAT
 

Comments 7

Guest - Cherie on Friday, 13 February 2015 06:37

My daughter accompanies for church and our younger homeschool choir. In addition, she has given informal performances at recitals, coffee houses, and at church (special music). I've listed it as "Piano 1 with Performance and Accompaniment" (for freshman year...2, 3, and 4 for subsequent years). I felt that more accurately reflected her experience and skills.

My daughter accompanies for church and our younger homeschool choir. In addition, she has given informal performances at recitals, coffee houses, and at church (special music). I've listed it as "Piano 1 with Performance and Accompaniment" (for freshman year...2, 3, and 4 for subsequent years). I felt that more accurately reflected her experience and skills.
Guest - Assistant to The HomeScholar on Saturday, 14 February 2015 14:54

Brilliant, Cherie!
Robin
Assistant to The HomeScholar

Brilliant, Cherie! Robin Assistant to The HomeScholar
Guest - Laura Viherlahti (website) on Saturday, 24 May 2014 08:42

Hi,
My daughter, Julia, is a Strings player, Double Bass and Violin. When she needed to understand music theory basics in middle school she took Piano lessons. We later counted these on her High School transcript as "Applied Music Theory 1", 2, 3, and 4.
She is primarily a Bass player so even mentioning piano wouldn't have given her any "creds". She was admitted to UW Seattle Music department and received the largest strings scholarship they have given out in 20 years. She is graduating this summer with a double major after 7 quarters at UW. Her love is her private Suzuki studio where she teaches violin and bass to young children.

Hi, My daughter, Julia, is a Strings player, Double Bass and Violin. When she needed to understand music theory basics in middle school she took Piano lessons. We later counted these on her High School transcript as "Applied Music Theory 1", 2, 3, and 4. She is primarily a Bass player so even mentioning piano wouldn't have given her any "creds". She was admitted to UW Seattle Music department and received the largest strings scholarship they have given out in 20 years. She is graduating this summer with a double major after 7 quarters at UW. Her love is her private Suzuki studio where she teaches violin and bass to young children.
Guest - Assistant to The HomeScholar on Monday, 26 May 2014 09:41

Dear Laura,

That was REALLY smart! You described was covered in a way that didn't limit the benefits of the education!! Well done.

Robin
Assistant to The HomeScholar

Dear Laura, That was REALLY smart! You described was covered in a way that didn't limit the benefits of the education!! Well done. Robin Assistant to The HomeScholar
Guest - Beth on Friday, 16 May 2014 18:21

My sophomore daughter has a love for, and a collection of, Nancy Drew computer games. In fact, she has "solved" 29 of the mysteries, and is currently working through the newest, #30, that arrived in the mail today. Over the last few years, we have become accustomed to hearing, "Oh, I learned about that from Nancy Drew." A while back, she commented that it was too bad that she could not receive credit for all of the time she spent playing the games, especially since she had learned so much! I didn't give it much thought until a few days ago, when she was discussing the brain-teaser puzzles that must be solved in order to advance through the game. Then it hit me; critical thinking! I only intend to use 1 elective credit, even though she has put in enough hours for way more than that. Those who have not been exposed to the games may not realize how amazingly educational they are, so I'm still trying to figure out how it should be listed on transcripts.

My sophomore daughter has a love for, and a collection of, Nancy Drew computer games. In fact, she has "solved" 29 of the mysteries, and is currently working through the newest, #30, that arrived in the mail today. Over the last few years, we have become accustomed to hearing, "Oh, I learned about that from Nancy Drew." A while back, she commented that it was too bad that she could not receive credit for all of the time she spent playing the games, especially since she had learned so much! I didn't give it much thought until a few days ago, when she was discussing the brain-teaser puzzles that must be solved in order to advance through the game. Then it hit me; critical thinking! I only intend to use 1 elective credit, even though she has put in enough hours for way more than that. Those who have not been exposed to the games may not realize how amazingly educational they are, so I'm still trying to figure out how it should be listed on transcripts.
Guest - JW on Wednesday, 26 March 2014 09:41

The most creative course title I came up with was "Equine and Canine Management." She didn't really read enough books to do each as a separate course, she wrote only one essay, and she didn't earn any certificates or win any competitions. We own the dog, she only gets to work with horses once a week. So I smooshed everything she did with animals together, and lo and behold, she had a credit.

The most creative course title I came up with was "Equine and Canine Management." She didn't really read enough books to do each as a separate course, she wrote only one essay, and she didn't earn any certificates or win any competitions. We own the dog, she only gets to work with horses once a week. So I smooshed everything she did with animals together, and lo and behold, she had a credit.
Guest - Assistant to The HomeScholar on Thursday, 27 March 2014 14:35

I think that's brilliant, Jo!

Robin
Assistant to The HomeScholar

I think that's brilliant, Jo! Robin Assistant to The HomeScholar
Already Registered? Login Here
Guest
Monday, 28 September 2020

By accepting you will be accessing a service provided by a third-party external to https://www.homehighschoolhelp.com/

More Encouraging Posts

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10
  • 11
  • 12
  • 13
  • 14
  • 15
  • 16
  • 17
  • 18
  • 19
  • 20
  • 21
  • 22
  • 23
  • 24
  • 25
  • 26
  • 27
  • 28
  • 29
  • 30
  • 31
  • 32
  • 33
  • 34
  • 35
  • 36
  • 37
  • 38
  • 39
  • 40
  • 41
  • 42
  • 43
  • 44
  • 45
  • 46
  • 47
  • 48
  • 49
  • 50
  • 51
  • 52
  • 53