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Are We Failing Our Geniuses?

An article in Time magazine asks "Are We Failing Our Geniuses?"  Often in school systems, children aren't permitted to learn at their level in each subject.  The are put into age-specific classes, and only provided educational material based on their age.  The article says, "Many school systems are wary of grade skipping even though research shows that it usually works well both academically and socially for gifted students--and that holding them back can lead to isolation and underachievement."

Teen


If you are homeschooling a gifted child, you aren't alone.  This long article can provide support.  Homeschooling is the perfect solution for gifted children.

Are We Failing Our Geniuses?

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If you are curious about providing a great homeschool education for your gifted child, check out my audio training, "Gifted Education at Home."
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Comments 4

Guest - Annie Kate on Tuesday, 10 June 2014 03:11

You are so correct in this. Homeschooling allows children of all abilities to work at their own level. Even in homeschool, though, one needs to be careful to challenge bright kids. We've forgotten this a few times: http://anniekateshomeschoolreviews.com/2010/05/overwhelmed-under-challenged-unmotivated-disobedient-or-just-plain-lazy/


Unfortunately, the Time article you mention is no longer freely available. If you still have access, it would be wonderful if you would list the main points of the article.

You are so correct in this. Homeschooling allows children of all abilities to work at their own level. Even in homeschool, though, one needs to be careful to challenge bright kids. We've forgotten this a few times: http://anniekateshomeschoolreviews.com/2010/05/overwhelmed-under-challenged-unmotivated-disobedient-or-just-plain-lazy/ Unfortunately, the Time article you mention is no longer freely available. If you still have access, it would be wonderful if you would list the main points of the article.
Guest - Assistant to The HomeScholar on Tuesday, 10 June 2014 12:14

I see what you mean, Annie. There is only an excerpt now.

Robin
Assistant to The HomeScholar

I see what you mean, Annie. There is only an excerpt now. Robin Assistant to The HomeScholar
Guest - April Edwards on Thursday, 30 August 2012 08:21

Thank you Lee for emailing this to me (I'm a gold club subscriber). This is the EXACT reason we are homeschooling our profoundly gifted son (IQ over 155+).

When he started reading at age two we knew we were in for an educational challenge (we had prior experiences with our gifted yet handicapped daughter).

We enrolled him in public school for kindergarten and that was a total failure. The school didn't know what to do with him or where to place him. They were afraid to place him in the higher grades because he was emotionally too immature but the kindergarten teacher told us that since he could already read and that she had 20 other children who couldn't, that she could not spend time with him to advance his reading skills. We pulled him out after this and enrolled him in a private school that worked with every child one on one for reading and math. After 3 years, this school moved more than two hours away. We couldn't do the daily drive. In all the schools in the nation's 6th largest city, we could not find a school that could educate our son.

So, we decided to homeschool until a better option (aka school) came along. We quickly realized that homeschool was the best option. He was challenged, he was learning, we were all happy. So we continued, I temporarily gave up my career (I'm a voice actor) to homeschool him, it's a fully time job! We sought the help of a Mensa youth coordinator in our area. Her advise was a great help in selecting educational materials, designing curriculum, and keeping him interested and challanged.

Our son is a lot like the children mentioned in the article, he's smart and he knows it. This can make him arrogant at times and this puts people off. Because he speaks as if he's a college professor, others (including adults) feel uncomfortable around him. He has been beaten up and bullied at schools because he knew all the right answers and then some. He has friends but very few. He is a loner and he likes it, he says being a loner makes him feel safe.

We just relocated back to the states from Spain (we're your Navy family!) and have to reestablish activities. He has started back into a martial arts school in a class of teenagers (he already has a black belt in another style and is starting over as a white belt - a wanted challenge for him); and starts swim club next week. He's also joining the city's theater/opera group this fall.

The Davidson school is a great idea. I just don't know if it would've worked for us. Having the family together is important for healthy emotional development and to know first hand what normal/healthy family interactions are. Unfortunately, moving to this school seems like it has fractured some families.

Homeschooling works for us.

Thank you Lee for emailing this to me (I'm a gold club subscriber). This is the EXACT reason we are homeschooling our profoundly gifted son (IQ over 155+). When he started reading at age two we knew we were in for an educational challenge (we had prior experiences with our gifted yet handicapped daughter). We enrolled him in public school for kindergarten and that was a total failure. The school didn't know what to do with him or where to place him. They were afraid to place him in the higher grades because he was emotionally too immature but the kindergarten teacher told us that since he could already read and that she had 20 other children who couldn't, that she could not spend time with him to advance his reading skills. We pulled him out after this and enrolled him in a private school that worked with every child one on one for reading and math. After 3 years, this school moved more than two hours away. We couldn't do the daily drive. In all the schools in the nation's 6th largest city, we could not find a school that could educate our son. So, we decided to homeschool until a better option (aka school) came along. We quickly realized that homeschool was the best option. He was challenged, he was learning, we were all happy. So we continued, I temporarily gave up my career (I'm a voice actor) to homeschool him, it's a fully time job! We sought the help of a Mensa youth coordinator in our area. Her advise was a great help in selecting educational materials, designing curriculum, and keeping him interested and challanged. Our son is a lot like the children mentioned in the article, he's smart and he knows it. This can make him arrogant at times and this puts people off. Because he speaks as if he's a college professor, others (including adults) feel uncomfortable around him. He has been beaten up and bullied at schools because he knew all the right answers and then some. He has friends but very few. He is a loner and he likes it, he says being a loner makes him feel safe. We just relocated back to the states from Spain (we're your Navy family!) and have to reestablish activities. He has started back into a martial arts school in a class of teenagers (he already has a black belt in another style and is starting over as a white belt - a wanted challenge for him); and starts swim club next week. He's also joining the city's theater/opera group this fall. The Davidson school is a great idea. I just don't know if it would've worked for us. Having the family together is important for healthy emotional development and to know first hand what normal/healthy family interactions are. Unfortunately, moving to this school seems like it has fractured some families. Homeschooling works for us.
Guest - Lisa (website) on Monday, 15 February 2010 19:29

Interesting article! Thanks for sharing.

Interesting article! Thanks for sharing.
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