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Acronyms for Outside Classes

When homeschoolers take classes outside the home, the transcript can seem a little complicated.  You can make it easily understandable by simply using acronyms for outside classes.
acronyms for outside classes


Acronyms for Outside Classes


Choose an acronym for each location where your child took classes. Here are some examples:
DHS = Denver High School
HCC = Highline Community College
FHC = Family Homeschool Cooperative

Once you have chosen an acronym, use it on your child's homeschool transcript.  This will help colleges figure out where each class was taken, and where they can expect other transcripts to come from.

Place the acronym by class title on the transcript. For example:
DHS:  Algebra 1
HCC: SOC 101: Introduction to Sociology
FHC: Latin 1

Then in key or legend toward the bottom of your transcript, define what each acronym means.  It might look like this:
DHS:  Classes taken at Denver High School
HCC: Dual enrollment classes at Highline Community College
FHC: Homeschool co-op classes taken at Family Homeschool Cooperative

If the outside classes were taken at a brick and mortar school, your homeschool transcript grade should look exactly like the transcript grade that comes from that school.  Homeschool co-ops are not schools, so if they give you a grade it's really just a "serving suggestion" based on their interactions with your student.  If your student took classes at a community college, high school, alt ed program, or accredited online school, you must use their grades, and have them each send a transcript directly to the college.  In fact, if your child has withdrawn from public school, classes taken there can be listed on the homeschool transcript as well.


Will your child's transcript include a lot of acronyms for outside classes? Please share!



If you need any extra help, you will really appreciate my Gold Care Club, full of templates and tools to help you homeschool high school.
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Comments 4

Shelley Mallory on Monday, 02 April 2018 22:18

My son has taken a couple of classes from a local high school, a few from a homeschool coop and the rest at home. All 3 had different grading scales. The school gave a letter grade only, but my husband was the teacher and gave me a percentage (not sure how this will look). The coop is 94-100 equals and A. My home scale is 90-100 is an A. How do I reconcile this?

My son has taken a couple of classes from a local high school, a few from a homeschool coop and the rest at home. All 3 had different grading scales. The school gave a letter grade only, but my husband was the teacher and gave me a percentage (not sure how this will look). The coop is 94-100 equals and A. My home scale is 90-100 is an A. How do I reconcile this?
Lee Binz on Tuesday, 03 April 2018 19:34

Shelley,
That's a good question for Lee when you send your records in for review. Typically, you would include a key for your grading scale, only, and then make sure that you include an acronym next to each class taken somewhere else. I would imagine that colleges would assume that your grading scale would be different than the co-op and local high school, but Lee will tell you if you should do anything else. Here's an article about the acronyms for outside classes: https://www.homehighschoolhelp.com/blogs/acronyms-for-outside-classes
Robin
Assistant to The HomeScholar

Shelley, That's a good question for Lee when you send your records in for review. Typically, you would include a key for your grading scale, only, and then make sure that you include an acronym next to each class taken somewhere else. I would imagine that colleges would assume that your grading scale would be different than the co-op and local high school, but Lee will tell you if you should do anything else. Here's an article about the acronyms for outside classes: https://www.homehighschoolhelp.com/blogs/acronyms-for-outside-classes Robin Assistant to The HomeScholar
Guest - Lee (website) on Monday, 01 October 2012 11:07

Dear Sheryl,

If you have had her in a "real school" that uses a real transcript, then you are forever stuck with those grades. If you finish up the class as a homeschooler, the school is not obligated to change their grade, so using their course schedule may not get you anything at all.

You can choose to make a homeschool transcript that does not include any grades from other schools. However, the transcript from that school must still be sent to the colleges when you apply.

You can choose to have her "re-take" the class, and replace the grade at home. You can have her retake the class in any way that you want, and there are no rule about how to do that. Colleges may wonder about that, though, so it might be helpful to have a test to back it up - either a curriculum final exam (any curriculum) or a SAT subject test in the area.

It's often helpful to explain the situation in a cover letter. A cover letter introduces the transcript when you send it to a college, and usually it's just as simple as "This is the transcript for my daughter...." In your situation, you can also include a description about the situation. It would be very brief, pretty much just like you said it to me.

I hope that helps!

Blessings,
Lee

Dear Sheryl, If you have had her in a "real school" that uses a real transcript, then you are forever stuck with those grades. If you finish up the class as a homeschooler, the school is not obligated to change their grade, so using their course schedule may not get you anything at all. You can choose to make a homeschool transcript that does not include any grades from other schools. However, the transcript from that school must still be sent to the colleges when you apply. You can choose to have her "re-take" the class, and replace the grade at home. You can have her retake the class in any way that you want, and there are no rule about how to do that. Colleges may wonder about that, though, so it might be helpful to have a test to back it up - either a curriculum final exam (any curriculum) or a SAT subject test in the area. It's often helpful to explain the situation in a cover letter. A cover letter introduces the transcript when you send it to a college, and usually it's just as simple as "This is the transcript for my daughter...." In your situation, you can also include a description about the situation. It would be very brief, pretty much just like you said it to me. I hope that helps! Blessings, Lee
Guest - Sheryl Roberts on Sunday, 30 September 2012 20:59

I have a question. I pulled my 9th grade daughter out of school last year because my husband's job changed and we were going to have more time to travel and therefore could not commit to the strict school schedule. However, we did enroll her in the 9th grade science class at that school. We will be leaving before school ends for the US (we live overseas) and therefore will not finish the course here but in the US. I was thinking of just using the teacher's grade as a guideline for my transcript up to the point we leave but not having an official transcript sent from the school. Would that work? How would I document that? I would like to use this teacher later as a reference.

I have a question. I pulled my 9th grade daughter out of school last year because my husband's job changed and we were going to have more time to travel and therefore could not commit to the strict school schedule. However, we did enroll her in the 9th grade science class at that school. We will be leaving before school ends for the US (we live overseas) and therefore will not finish the course here but in the US. I was thinking of just using the teacher's grade as a guideline for my transcript up to the point we leave but not having an official transcript sent from the school. Would that work? How would I document that? I would like to use this teacher later as a reference.
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Monday, 25 May 2020

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