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4 Ways to Use Huge, Amazing, Tremendous, Wonderful, High School Experiences

#4 Ways to Use Huge, Amazing, Tremendous, Wonderful, High School Experiences @TheHomeScholar4 Ways to Use Huge, Amazing, Tremendous, Wonderful, High School Experiences


A mission trip to Haiti, touring the castles of Europe, or sailing the globe - how do you use the amazing things your child has experienced? They are ALWAYS educational and awesome, but when your child is in high school, there are 4 ways to use those experiences to improve your chances of college admission and scholarships.

A huge, tremendous, wonderful, high school experience can be used in these four ways.

1. Field Trip Listed on Course Description


When you are traveling or visiting anything, it might be considered a field trip for one of your high school classes. A mission trip to Haiti might be a field trip for Spanish class, for example. Provide a descriptive paragraph of your class, list your textbooks or resources, but also list your field trips and experiences on your course description. (Need help? Take my free class on course descriptions.)

2. Activity and Awards List on the Transcript


Special trips with mission groups or service communities can be listed on your activity list. There is a short list of activities on the transcript.That mention on the transcript is so short that the name of each activity is as short as a class title, like this: Mission Trip to Haiti 2013. It's OK for something to be listed as an activity when it's on the transcript (read more: Delight-Directed Learning – Transcript or Activity List)

3. Separate Detailed Activity and Awards List


Keep a longer activity list that gives all the details, with the organization, the type of activity, and the hours and years it was completed. This is much more detailed than what is on the transcript. It's part of your comprehensive homeschool record, and it looks more like a resume. For example, it might look like this: Mission Trip to Haiti, home construction with Habitat for Humanity, 100 volunteer hours, June 2013. (Feeling stuck here? Read more:  How to Create an Extraordinary Activity List for Perfectly Ordinary Teens)

4. Topic for College Application Essay


A huge, tremendous, wonderful, high school experience is usually memorable and rewarding for the student, so it's a great experience as a topic for your college application essay. The more unusual the topic you choose, the more likely the college will remember your child above all the other applicant's essays. College Admission Essay Tip: Make Grandma Gasp, Not Blush!

The only thing you really need to remember is that all homeschool experiences are valuable and important, but only experiences done during high school can be used with your high school records. (Read more about Comprehensive Homeschool Records)

I'm always so intimidated by the awesome things homeschoolers have done. What is the most huge, amazing, tremendous, and wonderful experience your high school student has had?

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Comments 4

Guest - Cynthia Dunn on Tuesday, 21 July 2015 05:24

This is not eactly amazing, but....
Two years ago my daughter, 13, babysat weekly for a moms' group. There were typically 6-8 kids, from babies to preschoolers. They paid her $20 for the 2.5 hours which was okay as her first experience doing childcare. Then last year, the other sitter had to bow out so they asked me to do it. Well, I had to drive her and pick her up anyway, so staying wasn't a big deal. But, then they asked us to provide some kind of "lite" program for the kids too. Hmmm. That was her first year of high school and we had enough things going on but then I thought of what I did with her when she was little and remembered the Before Five In A Row program where you read a certain children's book each week and do learning activities related to the story. Then I thought it would be more worthwhile if SHE did it with the kids and I could count it has Early Childhood Education - so she did. She read all the info in the book, planned and carried out the lessons with my oversight and teaching help, gathered and packed supplies each week, incorporated ideas of her own, and it was great. I also bought a course on Early Childhood Education that she worked through at the same time and was able to study different views, notable styles like Montessori and others, and how young childen learn. All in all, we counted it as a one year course on "Career Exploration: Early Childhood Education" because she got the book work in along with the practical experience. And, she got paid at the same time, plus made some contacts for future babysitting work! The parents and the church's coordinator were thrilled with what we had done. I asked the coordinator to write a short letter of commendation at year's end including specific points about what my daughter did, her reliability, etc. so that it had some meat to it. It turned out great and nicely rounded out the course.

Gotta say, I did pat myself on the back for making the most of that!

This is not eactly amazing, but.... Two years ago my daughter, 13, babysat weekly for a moms' group. There were typically 6-8 kids, from babies to preschoolers. They paid her $20 for the 2.5 hours which was okay as her first experience doing childcare. Then last year, the other sitter had to bow out so they asked me to do it. Well, I had to drive her and pick her up anyway, so staying wasn't a big deal. But, then they asked us to provide some kind of "lite" program for the kids too. Hmmm. That was her first year of high school and we had enough things going on but then I thought of what I did with her when she was little and remembered the Before Five In A Row program where you read a certain children's book each week and do learning activities related to the story. Then I thought it would be more worthwhile if SHE did it with the kids and I could count it has Early Childhood Education - so she did. She read all the info in the book, planned and carried out the lessons with my oversight and teaching help, gathered and packed supplies each week, incorporated ideas of her own, and it was great. I also bought a course on Early Childhood Education that she worked through at the same time and was able to study different views, notable styles like Montessori and others, and how young childen learn. All in all, we counted it as a one year course on "Career Exploration: Early Childhood Education" because she got the book work in along with the practical experience. And, she got paid at the same time, plus made some contacts for future babysitting work! The parents and the church's coordinator were thrilled with what we had done. I asked the coordinator to write a short letter of commendation at year's end including specific points about what my daughter did, her reliability, etc. so that it had some meat to it. It turned out great and nicely rounded out the course. Gotta say, I did pat myself on the back for making the most of that!
Guest - Assistant to The HomeScholar on Tuesday, 21 July 2015 20:40

Well done, Cynthia!
That's exactly the kind of thing Lee would suggest! You took an experience, kept good records, and made it count!
Robin
Assistant to The HomeScholar

Well done, Cynthia! That's exactly the kind of thing Lee would suggest! You took an experience, kept good records, and made it count! Robin Assistant to The HomeScholar
Guest - Donna on Thursday, 30 July 2015 04:03

This is the perfect read for me today. I am trying to decide how to document an 11-day mission trip to Thailand. My 16-year-old daughter traveled there, meeting a team of strangers in Atlanta and taught English camp at a Buddhist school, then ministered in refugee villages at night.

This child also has one-year of employment as a preschool music teacher and is starting her second. She developed a comprehensive curriculum that supplemented a very dated (and boring) lesson plan. Reading the last posters comment has given me some ideas!

This is the perfect read for me today. I am trying to decide how to document an 11-day mission trip to Thailand. My 16-year-old daughter traveled there, meeting a team of strangers in Atlanta and taught English camp at a Buddhist school, then ministered in refugee villages at night. This child also has one-year of employment as a preschool music teacher and is starting her second. She developed a comprehensive curriculum that supplemented a very dated (and boring) lesson plan. Reading the last posters comment has given me some ideas!
Guest - Lee (website) on Thursday, 30 July 2015 09:12

Don't you love homeschooling, that allows us to give our kids such rich experiences!!! I love it!
Blessings,
Lee

Don't you love homeschooling, that allows us to give our kids such rich experiences!!! I love it! Blessings, Lee
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