How to Put Dual Enrollment on Your Homeschool Transcript


Dual enrollment. It can be such a sticking point for homeschool families making a homeschool transcript. Follow the 6 steps below to put dual enrollment on your child's transcript.

homeschool transcript dual enrollment @TheHomeScholar
This post will tell you how to put dual enrollment on a transcript. Want to see what a scholarship-winning transcript actually looks like? Click to download The HomeScholar Record Keeping Samples

    You can count college credits in high school. Below are the specifics of converting college credits to high school credits, and how to put it on the transcript.

  1. Choose an acronym
    Create an acronym for each college or high school location where your child took classes. Like this:
    HCC = Highline Community College
    I like using the CC part of the acronym for community college, it makes it look so obvious that you are dual enrolled.

  2. Place the acronym before the class title on the transcript
    Where you normally put the class title, put in the acronym first, and then use the exact class title that is provided by the community college. Like this:
    HCC SOC 101: Introduction to Sociology
    HCC MAT 101: College Calculus
    HCC ART 100: Survey of Fine Art

  3. Define the acronym in key or legend
    At the bottom of your transcript, explain what the acronym means. Like these options:
    HCC: Dual enrollment classes at Highline Community College
    HCC indicates classes taken at Highline Community College

  4. Translate college credits to high school credits
    How many college credits equals a high school credit? One whole college class is equivalent to one high school credit. If your child is taking one whole college class, worth 4, 5, or 6 credits, then it is one whole high school credit. If the college class is 1, 2, or 3 credits, I suggest calling it a half credit class.

  5. Insert the exact grade from the college
    No matter what the grade is, put the grade on the transcript. You can change it from the number grade to a letter grade, or translate it from a letter grade to a number grade, but you can't actually change the grade. College classes are just plain harder than high school classes, and it's very difficult to get A's in college, even when a child is used to getting A's in high school. (Read more: Community College Success)

  6. I don't recommend weighting grades
    If you do decide to weight grades, then it would be easiest to weight it the same as an AP class. However, every high school in the country seems to have their own unique way of weighting grades, which is why I don’t recommend weighting them. It makes it harder for colleges, and colleges will like you more if you make their job easier.  Here is the problem, every high school has a different policy on weighting grades. There are so many variation possibilities, and colleges need to compare students from different schools and school districts. For that reason, the first thing they do is to un-weight any weighted grades. Colleges have asked me to tell parents not to weight grades, and so I don’t recommend weighting grades unless your first choice college prefers grades that way. (Read more: Why I Do Not Recommend Weighting Grades)

homeschool transcript dual enrollment @TheHomeScholar
All parents know that the homeschool transcript is the least of our worries about community college. Our bigger concern is actually how our child performs in the real life college situation, both academically and socially. I do have one big tip to help you guide your child toward higher college grades. The answer lies in vocabulary. 80% of a subject is learned through the vocabulary alone - in other words, if you master the vocabulary, you are 80% of the way to getting an A in the class. Get some flash cards, highlight the book with the vocabulary words, and have the child quiz himself or herself on those vocabulary words.

For answers to your questions on transcripts, take my free class on Grades, Credits, and Transcripts.
Click here to get my free recorded class on Grades, Credits, and Transcripts

If you still have questions, consider getting the Total Transcript Solution. It has a lot of additional resources, and thoroughly answers all common difficulties, while giving you the tools you need to get things done. At the same time, the Total Transcript Solution has one consultation, so you and I can talk together if you still have a question that hasn't been answered.
Learn more about the Total Transcript Solution

Does that explain it all? I hope that make sense to you!

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Comments 32

Guest - Betsey Reynozo on Tuesday, 03 August 2021 15:57

Thank you Lee for having this up. I have graduated two already and used your Total Transcript program. One daughter graduated debt free in May, the other is on track for similar results (she's a Jr. in college this year, but will probably graduate in 2 1/2 years since she changed her major 3 times.....all in CC fortunately). My youngest is a Sr in high school this year and is the first of our kids to take advantage of dual credit last year. I have followed your advice (learned the hard way with the oldest) and finish up that school year's transcript in the Spring, so I don't forget anything and it's done. I could not remember how I annotate her CC courses on the transcript, so came back here to see if I could find it without having to start all over with the Total Transcript. Thanks!!! Youngest had all virtual last year and a hybrid this year (which helps our family not fight over vehicles for the Fall). But she already has 22 credits from the CC under her belt and had straight A's, so was awarded the Presidential Scholar award as a Jr. in high school. Hoping this will help bring some money in for her as she wants to become a nurse or PA. She has basically put me out of a job as homeschool mom, as this year she is basically all dual credit. What will I do with myself?

Anyway, thank you again for having this up and as clear as possible. I do refer your site to others how are now thinking of homeschooling high school. Once you get yourself into the routine at the beginning of the school year, a little tweaking in the middle and asap at the end it takes hardly any time at all.

Betsey Reynozo
Alexandria, VA

Thank you Lee for having this up. I have graduated two already and used your Total Transcript program. One daughter graduated debt free in May, the other is on track for similar results (she's a Jr. in college this year, but will probably graduate in 2 1/2 years since she changed her major 3 times.....all in CC fortunately). My youngest is a Sr in high school this year and is the first of our kids to take advantage of dual credit last year. I have followed your advice (learned the hard way with the oldest) and finish up that school year's transcript in the Spring, so I don't forget anything and it's done. I could not remember how I annotate her CC courses on the transcript, so came back here to see if I could find it without having to start all over with the Total Transcript. Thanks!!! Youngest had all virtual last year and a hybrid this year (which helps our family not fight over vehicles for the Fall). But she already has 22 credits from the CC under her belt and had straight A's, so was awarded the Presidential Scholar award as a Jr. in high school. Hoping this will help bring some money in for her as she wants to become a nurse or PA. She has basically put me out of a job as homeschool mom, as this year she is basically all dual credit. What will I do with myself? :D Anyway, thank you again for having this up and as clear as possible. I do refer your site to others how are now thinking of homeschooling high school. Once you get yourself into the routine at the beginning of the school year, a little tweaking in the middle and asap at the end it takes hardly any time at all. Betsey Reynozo Alexandria, VA
Jennifer on Tuesday, 03 August 2021 19:10

Hi Betsey,

Congratulations on all your successes in homeschooling! I'm so glad that Lee's resources have proved so helpful for you over the years. It sounds like you have made great plans and things are working well for everyone!

Thank you so much for referring others to this site, and we wish you continued success and blessings as you discover "what to do with yourself" at this stage in life. I'm sure it will be full of good things.

Blessings,
Jennifer
Assistant to Lee

Hi Betsey, Congratulations on all your successes in homeschooling! I'm so glad that Lee's resources have proved so helpful for you over the years. It sounds like you have made great plans and things are working well for everyone! Thank you so much for referring others to this site, and we wish you continued success and blessings as you discover "what to do with yourself" at this stage in life. I'm sure it will be full of good things. :) Blessings, Jennifer Assistant to Lee
Karen Silverio on Thursday, 15 July 2021 05:22

Dear Lee,

I enjoyed that blog post! Thank you! My son will be in 9th grade this fall and I have met with someone from the Engineering Department of the Community College where I want him to get dual enrollment. He gave me a print out of what dual enrollment [DE] subjects they’ll credit in their department. For Science, they want 3 Sciences and 1 Social and Behavioral Science. The Behavioral Sciences they will give credit to are: PSY 101, SOC 101, GEO 105. I really don’t want him to do Community College just yet so I’m planning on him CLEPping out of the Sociology course for his Freshman year and put that under the “Science Subject”. For Sophomore, Junior, and Senior years, he’ll do regular Biology, DE Chemistry, and DE Physics, respectively. Can we do that? Do CLEP Sociology for Freshman Science?

Dear Lee, I enjoyed that blog post! Thank you! My son will be in 9th grade this fall and I have met with someone from the Engineering Department of the Community College where I want him to get dual enrollment. He gave me a print out of what dual enrollment [[b]DE[/b]] subjects they’ll credit in their department. For Science, they want 3 Sciences and 1 Social and Behavioral Science. The Behavioral Sciences they will give credit to are: PSY 101, SOC 101, GEO 105. I really don’t want him to do Community College just yet so I’m planning on him CLEPping out of the Sociology course for his Freshman year and put that under the “Science Subject”. For Sophomore, Junior, and Senior years, he’ll do regular Biology, [b]DE[/b] Chemistry, and [b]DE[/b] Physics, respectively. Can we do that? Do [b]CLEP[/b] Sociology for Freshman Science?
Lee Binz on Thursday, 15 July 2021 19:04

Catherine, I'm glad you enjoy it! Your questions really depend on which college your son ultimately goes to, but I don't want you to think you "should" do dual enrollment, just to be clear. This post is about how to put it on the transcript IF you use dual enrollment. Please read this article, Facing the Community College Fad, to get another perspective. https://www.homehighschoolhelp.com/community-college-fad

To use CLEP, you need to make sure that ultimate college you attend will accept CLEP courses. So it would really depend on the community college that he wants to attend. My son knew that his 3 top colleges accepted CLEP, so he used CLEP to pass his psychology requirement and it worked out great. Read more about homeschooling college course with CLEP https://www.homehighschoolhelp.com/homeschool-college-clep

Blessings,
Lee

Catherine, I'm glad you enjoy it! Your questions really depend on which college your son ultimately goes to, but I don't want you to think you "should" do dual enrollment, just to be clear. This post is about how to put it on the transcript IF you use dual enrollment. Please read this article, Facing the Community College Fad, to get another perspective. https://www.homehighschoolhelp.com/community-college-fad To use CLEP, you need to make sure that ultimate college you attend will accept CLEP courses. So it would really depend on the community college that he wants to attend. My son knew that his 3 top colleges accepted CLEP, so he used CLEP to pass his psychology requirement and it worked out great. Read more about homeschooling college course with CLEP https://www.homehighschoolhelp.com/homeschool-college-clep Blessings, Lee
Karen Silverio on Thursday, 15 July 2021 19:14

Thank you .Thank you. Thank you! These 2 links were VERY helpful! I found my answers there. XOXO from Colorado!

Thank you .Thank you. Thank you! These 2 links were VERY helpful! I found my answers there. XOXO from Colorado!
Lee Binz on Thursday, 15 July 2021 19:24

YAY!!! That's awesome - thanks for getting back to me!
Blessings,
Lee

:D YAY!!! That's awesome - thanks for getting back to me! Blessings, Lee
Guest - Rochelle on Monday, 28 December 2020 21:50

Lee,
I enjoyed your presentation very much. I would like to add that you can put "number values" on those extra things that are integral to homeschooling education by using rubrics, especially for those of us who have the need to use numbers. I use rubrics to set a clear outline of what is expected and have done this for learning such as "life skills," "basic home renovation," "gymnastics," and after a vacation to Yellowstone writing a five page paper for geology and English composition credits. With gymnastics, since my son was at a high level in high school, I had him help me to determine what he felt he could accomplish each 9 weeks and set the rubrics accordingly.

Lee, I enjoyed your presentation very much. I would like to add that you can put "number values" on those extra things that are integral to homeschooling education by using rubrics, especially for those of us who have the need to use numbers. I use rubrics to set a clear outline of what is expected and have done this for learning such as "life skills," "basic home renovation," "gymnastics," and after a vacation to Yellowstone writing a five page paper for geology and English composition credits. With gymnastics, since my son was at a high level in high school, I had him help me to determine what he felt he could accomplish each 9 weeks and set the rubrics accordingly.
Robin on Monday, 28 December 2020 23:18

Good thinking, Rochelle!

Thank you for sharing your ideas!

Robin
Assistant to The HomeScholar

Good thinking, Rochelle! Thank you for sharing your ideas! Robin Assistant to The HomeScholar
Guest - gladden on Monday, 19 October 2020 18:48

Hi Lee. if my child gets a D on a college class but yet, takes it again, at another college and gets an A do I have to put it the D on the transcript or can I just replace it with the new grade?

Hi Lee. if my child gets a D on a college class but yet, takes it again, at another college and gets an A do I have to put it the D on the transcript or can I just replace it with the new grade?
Lee Binz on Tuesday, 20 October 2020 21:20

My guess is that each high school across the country would have their own policy on that. I have seen some high schools that indicate (R) by the class, but I don't think that's necessary. If it were me, I think I would replace the class on the homeschool transcript. I would give the NEW grade and be sure to indicate the NEW completion date. While the class might still be on the community college transcript, it does not need to be on your homeschool transcript if the class has been repeated. I hope that helps!
Blessings,
Lee

My guess is that each high school across the country would have their own policy on that. I have seen some high schools that indicate (R) by the class, but I don't think that's necessary. If it were me, I think I would replace the class on the homeschool transcript. I would give the NEW grade and be sure to indicate the NEW completion date. While the class might still be on the community college transcript, it does not need to be on your homeschool transcript if the class has been repeated. I hope that helps! Blessings, Lee
EMILY BYRD on Wednesday, 13 May 2020 02:44

Good evening. I am hoping that you will be able to answer my question, and I hope that I can word my question in a way that makes sense! For the duration of my daughter's high school career (two years so far), the grading scale that I have used for her transcripts is the simple one (A=4.0, B=3.0, etc...). However, the private college in which my daughter has now completed four dual-enrollment courses with has a different grading scale than what I use. Their scale is: (A=4.0, A-=3.7, B+=3.3, B=3.0, B-=2.7, and so on...). How do I record this change on her transcripts? Do I need to change my personal scale to match the college's scale? (I would really prefer not to do this because I love the simplicity of 4.0, 3.0, etc.!) But if I don't change my scale (which is listed at the bottom of the transcript), is it confusing to yet still record a 3.7 (A-) score that she received in Freshman Composition I? I'm just not for sure what to do! Help! Thanks in advance!

Good evening. I am hoping that you will be able to answer my question, and I hope that I can word my question in a way that makes sense! :p For the duration of my daughter's high school career (two years so far), the grading scale that I have used for her transcripts is the simple one (A=4.0, B=3.0, etc...). However, the private college in which my daughter has now completed four dual-enrollment courses with has a different grading scale than what I use. Their scale is: (A=4.0, A-=3.7, B+=3.3, B=3.0, B-=2.7, and so on...). How do I record this change on her transcripts? Do I need to change my personal scale to match the college's scale? (I would really prefer not to do this because I love the simplicity of 4.0, 3.0, etc.!) But if I don't change my scale (which is listed at the bottom of the transcript), is it confusing to yet still record a 3.7 (A-) score that she received in Freshman Composition I? I'm just not for sure what to do! Help! Thanks in advance!
Robin on Wednesday, 13 May 2020 15:17

Hi Emily,

Lee always recommends keeping your grading scale as it is. It may mean including the college's grading scale in your documentation as well, either as a little box on the transcript, or as an addition to your cover letter. Lee talks about how to create a cover letter here: How to Write a Cover Letter for Your Transcript - https://www.homehighschoolhelp.com/blogs/how-to-write-a-cover-letter-for-your-transcript

If you have not yet taken your consultation with Lee, that would be a good question to ask her.

Blessings,
Robin
Assistant to The HomeScholar

Hi Emily, Lee always recommends keeping your grading scale as it is. It may mean including the college's grading scale in your documentation as well, either as a little box on the transcript, or as an addition to your cover letter. Lee talks about how to create a cover letter here: How to Write a Cover Letter for Your Transcript - https://www.homehighschoolhelp.com/blogs/how-to-write-a-cover-letter-for-your-transcript If you have not yet taken your consultation with Lee, that would be a good question to ask her. Blessings, Robin Assistant to The HomeScholar
Lee Binz on Monday, 01 July 2019 21:58

Dear Laura,

I'm so sorry you are frustrated. This can be a very confusing subject, and each high school and school district may have different policies. It's really up to YOU to determine a policy for YOUR homeschool.

Most commonly what I see is that a college class that is 4-5-6 college credits is equivalent to 1 whole year (1 credit) of high school. What I most commonly see is that a college class of only 1-2 college credits is equivalent to a half year (or 1/2 credit) of high school. But with a 3 credit college class, it's about 50/50 whether a high school provides a whole high school credit or a half a high school credit.

My advice: choose a policy for your school and stick to it. Somewhere across the country you'll find someone to agree with it. I've even seen a high school that said ANY number of college credits equals a whole high school credit.

There were some typos made by my assistant that have been corrected in the replies to others, just so there is no more confusion.

To sum up: college credits and high school credits are NOT the same thing. Because they are both called "credits" it makes it confusing to write about and understand, but they are as different as measuring in yards instead of meters.

Blessings,
Lee

Dear Laura, I'm so sorry you are frustrated. This can be a very confusing subject, and each high school and school district may have different policies. It's really up to YOU to determine a policy for YOUR homeschool. Most commonly what I see is that a college class that is 4-5-6 college credits is equivalent to 1 whole year (1 credit) of high school. What I most commonly see is that a college class of only 1-2 college credits is equivalent to a half year (or 1/2 credit) of high school. But with a 3 credit college class, it's about 50/50 whether a high school provides a whole high school credit or a half a high school credit. My advice: choose a policy for your school and stick to it. Somewhere across the country you'll find someone to agree with it. I've even seen a high school that said ANY number of college credits equals a whole high school credit. There were some typos made by my assistant that have been corrected in the replies to others, just so there is no more confusion. To sum up: college credits and high school credits are NOT the same thing. Because they are both called "credits" it makes it confusing to write about and understand, but they are as different as measuring in yards instead of meters. Blessings, Lee
Guest - Laura on Saturday, 29 June 2019 17:56

It is frustrating that Mrs Binz keeps contradicting herself. Just up above in the conversation with Grace and Ami; she tells Grace " 1 semester = 1/2 credit of high school". Then when Ami says, "1 semester of college = 1 semester of high school doesn't seem right". Mrs Binz contradicts by saying 1st, that is correct, then goes on to say, "One whole college class equals one whole high school credit." ugh. It can't be both. I have always heard if a child takes say, English 111 in college. 3 credits, 1 semester long; it can be counted as a full 1 yr of high school English.

It is frustrating that Mrs Binz keeps contradicting herself. Just up above in the conversation with Grace and Ami; she tells Grace " 1 semester = 1/2 credit of high school". Then when Ami says, "1 semester of college = 1 semester of high school doesn't seem right". Mrs Binz contradicts by saying 1st, that is correct, then goes on to say, "One whole college class equals one whole high school credit." ugh. It can't be both. I have always heard if a child takes say, English 111 in college. 3 credits, 1 semester long; it can be counted as a full 1 yr of high school English.
Guest - Heather on Friday, 11 September 2020 17:24

High school credits, at least in my state, are assessed based on the number of class hours. 50 hours = 1/2 credit (1 semester); 100 hours = 1 full credit (2 semesters), though some school districts require 60 and 120 hours, respectively. For my daughter's online college classes, I have assigned her 100 hours of class time for the semester. With our schedule, that works out to just over an hour of work each school day and I've found that it's about the amount of time she needs anyway- any extra time is used creating and using study tools. This satisfies the requirements for both the college class, and a full high school credit.

High school credits, at least in my state, are assessed based on the number of class hours. 50 hours = 1/2 credit (1 semester); 100 hours = 1 full credit (2 semesters), though some school districts require 60 and 120 hours, respectively. For my daughter's online college classes, I have assigned her 100 hours of class time for the semester. With our schedule, that works out to just over an hour of work each school day and I've found that it's about the amount of time she needs anyway- any extra time is used creating and using study tools. This satisfies the requirements for both the college class, and a full high school credit.
Lee Binz on Friday, 11 September 2020 17:46

High school credits and college credits are calculated very differently. While a high school credit is normally 120-180 hours of work, or about an hour a day for most of the week and most of the school year, college credits are different. A full college class is completed in 6-8 weeks, not a whole year. One whole college class equals one whole high school credit in virtually every areas of the country.
Blessings,
Lee

High school credits and college credits are calculated very differently. While a high school credit is normally 120-180 hours of work, or about an hour a day for most of the week and most of the school year, college credits are different. A full college class is completed in 6-8 weeks, not a whole year. One whole college class equals one whole high school credit in virtually every areas of the country. Blessings, Lee
Support at The HomeScholar on Tuesday, 09 April 2019 21:01

Hi Karen,

It sounds like it's like a pass/fail kind of grade, is that correct? If so, Lee recommends putting it on the transcript the exact same way the college did, but do NOT include that class in GPA calculations.

I hope that helps!

Robin
Assistant to The HomeScholar

Hi Karen, It sounds like it's like a pass/fail kind of grade, is that correct? If so, Lee recommends putting it on the transcript the exact same way the college did, but do NOT include that class in GPA calculations. I hope that helps! Robin Assistant to The HomeScholar
Guest - Karen on Tuesday, 09 April 2019 00:49

How do you put a college course on the homeschool transcript that only awarded a grade of 'S'?

How do you put a college course on the homeschool transcript that only awarded a grade of 'S'?
Lee Binz on Monday, 01 July 2019 22:01

Some high schools will award a grade of A to all successfully completed college classes. Others will give a grade of 2.0 to all classes that earn an S (Satisfactory). At some high schools, they will keep the S for the grade in that class on the high school transcript and leave that class off their GPA calculations. So you have lots of options! It looks like it's time to find out what policy you want to use. Sometimes when moms feel insecure about making that kind of decision, it's easiest and least stressful to ask your local public high school what they do. It's not like we MUST do what they do, but it can help you not be so stressed out about it, or worried that you did it wrong.
Blessings,
Lee

Some high schools will award a grade of A to all successfully completed college classes. Others will give a grade of 2.0 to all classes that earn an S (Satisfactory). At some high schools, they will keep the S for the grade in that class on the high school transcript and leave that class off their GPA calculations. So you have lots of options! It looks like it's time to find out what policy you want to use. Sometimes when moms feel insecure about making that kind of decision, it's easiest and least stressful to ask your local public high school what they do. It's not like we MUST do what they do, but it can help you not be so stressed out about it, or worried that you did it wrong. Blessings, Lee
Guest - Grace on Thursday, 06 September 2018 15:16

The school my daughter is going to requires two units of foreign language in the same language. It stipulates on the website 1 unit = 1 year. She will be taking two semesters of sign at the cc near us. They are both 3 credit classes as are most of the classes at the school. Do you think a 3 credit class for this will be enough for a unit? If so, how do you put that on the transcript? Do we not have to send the official transcript from the school? She is taking a full courseload this year.

The school my daughter is going to requires two units of foreign language in the same language. It stipulates on the website 1 unit = 1 year. She will be taking two semesters of sign at the cc near us. They are both 3 credit classes as are most of the classes at the school. Do you think a 3 credit class for this will be enough for a unit? If so, how do you put that on the transcript? Do we not have to send the official transcript from the school? She is taking a full courseload this year.
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